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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English elfe, from Old English elfen, ælfen (nymph, spirit, fairy), feminine of elf, ælf (elf).

NounEdit

elfe (plural elfen or elfene)

  1. (obsolete) A female elf, a fairy, nymph
    • Scho was so faire & so fresche, as faucon hire semed, An elfe out of an-othire erde, or ellis an Aungell. — The Wars of Alexander, 1450
    (She was so fair and happy and seemed elegant, an elfe from another world or else an angel.)
    • He was takyn with an elfe ... When the clok stroke twelf was he forshapyn. — The Towneley Plays, 1500

ReferencesEdit

  1. MED, elf, elve(n)

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

elfo (elf) +‎ -e (adverb)

AdverbEdit

elfe

  1. in an elfin manner, elvishly
  2. in Elvish (language)

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Swedish älf, from Old Norse alfr, compare Old English ælf. Originated from Indo-European Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (brilliant, shining white) via Proto-Germanic *albiz (elf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elfe m (plural elfes)

  1. elf

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ælf.

NounEdit

elfe

  1. Alternative form of elf

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English ælfen.

NounEdit

elfe

  1. Alternative form of elven