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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fiːl/, [fiːɫ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan (to feel, perceive, touch), from Proto-West Germanic *fōlijan (to feel).[1]

VerbEdit

feel (third-person singular simple present feels, present participle feeling, simple past and past participle felt)

  1. (heading) To use or experience the sense of touch.
    1. (transitive, copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on.
      You can feel a heartbeat if you put your fingers on your breast.
      I felt cold and miserable all night.
    2. (transitive) To find one's way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements.
      I felt my way through the darkened room.
      I felt my way cautiously through the dangerous business maneuver.
    3. (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing.
    4. (intransitive) To search by sense of touch.
      He felt for the light switch in the dark.
  2. (heading) To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.
    1. (transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about.
      I can feel the sadness in his poems.
      • 1738, Alexander Pope, The Universal Prayer:
        Teach me to feel another's woe.
      • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
        Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
      • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
        British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.
    2. (transitive) To think, believe, or have an impression concerning.
      I feel that we need to try harder.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state.
      He obviously feels strongly about it.
      She felt even more upset when she heard the details.
    4. (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected.
      I feel for you and your plight.
  3. (transitive) To be or become aware of.
  4. (transitive) To experience the consequences of.
    Feel my wrath!
  5. (copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise).
    It looks like wood, but it feels more like plastic.
    This is supposed to be a party, but it feels more like a funeral!
  6. (transitive, US, slang) To understand.
    I don't want you back here, ya feel me?
    • 2002, “Work It”, in Under Construction, performed by Missy Elliott:
      Shoot, errbody have the zipper jacket / And half of these thugs have the glove to match, ya feel me?
Usage notesEdit
  • When referring to the emotional state, most prescriptive grammarians prefer "I feel bad" to "I feel badly", but "I feel badly" is widely used this way in US English.
  • Adjectives to which "feel" is often applied as a copula: free, cold, cool, warm, hot, young, old, good, great, fine, happy, glad, satisfied, excited, bad, depressed, unhappy, sad, blue, sorry, smart, stupid, loved, appreciated, accepted, rejected, lonely, isolated, insulted, offended, slighted, cheated, shy, refreshed, tired, exhausted, calm, relaxed, angry, annoyed, frustrated, anxious, worried, jealous, proud, confident, safe, grateful, uncomfortable, unsafe, insecure, desperate, guilty, ashamed, disappointed, dirty, odd, strange, ill, sick.
  • In senses 2,3, and 5, this is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb feel had the form feelest, and had feltest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form feeleth was used.
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from feel (verb)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

feel (plural feels)

  1. (archaic) The sense of touch.
    • 1838, John Burns, The Principles of Surgery, volume 1, page 330:
      It begins as a firm elastic swelling, which communicates to the feel the idea that a fluid is contained under a firm fascia[…].
  2. A perception experienced mainly or solely through the sense of touch.
    Bark has a rough feel.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      And then something in the sound or the feel of the waters made him look down, and he perceived that the ebb had begun and the tide was flowing out to sea.
  3. A vague mental impression.
    You should get a feel of the area before moving in.
  4. An act of fondling.
    She gave me a quick feel to show that she loves me.
  5. A vague understanding.
    I'm getting a feel for what you mean.
  6. An intuitive ability.
    She has a feel for music.
  7. (chiefly US, slang) A feeling; an emotion.
    I know that feel.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Korean: (ppil)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See fele.

PronounEdit

feel

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

AdjectiveEdit

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

AdverbEdit

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*fōljan-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 150

AnagramsEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian fēla.

VerbEdit

feel

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) to feel

Old CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin fidēlem (faithful). Replaced by the borrowing fidel in modern Catalan.

AdjectiveEdit

feel

  1. faithful

SeriEdit

NounEdit

feel (plural feeloj)

  1. mallard, Anas platyrhynchos