See also: felé, -féle, felë, fêle, and fêlé

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fele, from Old English feola, fela (much, many, very), from Proto-Germanic *felu (very, much), from Proto-Indo-European *pélh₁u (many). Cognate with Scots fele (many, much, great), Dutch veel (much, many), German viel (much, many), Latin plūs (more), Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many). Related to full.

AdverbEdit

fele

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Greatly, much, very
    For they bring in the substance of the Beere / That they drinken feele too good chepe, not dere.Hakluyt's Voyages.

AdjectiveEdit

fele (comparative feler, superlative felest)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Much; many.
    • 1513, Gavin Douglas, Eneados
      This cruel monstre, [] Infect with fell venoum;
    • 1589, Richard Hakluyt, The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nation, [], London: [] George Bishop and Ralph Newberie, deputies to Christopher Barker, [], OCLC 753964576:
      So fele shippes this yere there ware / That moch losse for vnfreyght they bare.
      So fele ships this year there were / that much loss for unfreight they bore.

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

fele

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Many (of).

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛlɛ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fe‧le
  • Rhymes: -lɛ

Etymology 1Edit

PostpositionEdit

fele

  1. (folksy) Alternative form of felé (in the direction of, around)

Etymology 2Edit

From the fel- stem of fél (half) +‎ -e (his/her/its, possessive suffix).

AdjectiveEdit

fele (not comparable)

  1. half (of the)
    A fele gond az enyém.Half (of) the trouble is mine.
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

fele

  1. third-person singular single-possession possessive of fél
    A pénz fele az enyém.Half of the money is mine.
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative fele
accusative felét
dative felének
instrumental felével
causal-final feléért
translative felévé
terminative feléig
essive-formal feleként
essive-modal feléül
inessive felében
superessive felén
adessive felénél
illative felébe
sublative felére
allative feléhez
elative feléből
delative feléről
ablative felétől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
feléé
non-attributive
possessive - plural
felééi
Derived termsEdit
Expressions

Further readingEdit

  • (noun sense; a derivative of fél (its half)): (2): fél in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (adjective): fele in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (postposition; dialectal alternative form of felé (towards him/her/it)): (1): felé in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

LatinEdit

NounEdit

fēle

  1. ablative singular of fēlēs

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Old English fela, felu, from Proto-West Germanic *felu, from Proto-Germanic *felu.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

fele

  1. Many, much; an indefinite large number of or quantity.
    • c. 1375, “Book II”, in Iohne Barbour, De geſtis bellis et uirtutibus domini Roberti de Brwyß [] (The Brus, Advocates MS. 19.2.2)‎[1], Ouchtirmunſye: Iohannes Ramſay, published 1489, folio 5, verso, lines 240-242; republished at Edinburgh: National Library of Scotland, c. 2010:
      James off Dowglas þat wes ſyne / Þ[at] yheyt þan wes bot litill off my[ch]t / And oþir fele folk foꝛſye in fy[ch]t []
      James of Douglas was next; / [he] was then only weak in power / and many other people, mighty in war []
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: fele (obsolete)
  • Middle Scots: fele (poetic)

PronounEdit

fele

  1. Many, much; an indefinite large number of or quantity.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: fele (obsolete)
  • Middle Scots: fele (poetic)

AdjectiveEdit

fele

  1. great, large, extreme
  2. (rare) numerous, manifold
DescendantsEdit
  • English: fele (obsolete)
  • Middle Scots: fele (poetic)

AdverbEdit

fele

  1. In a large amount or magnitude; much.
  2. Very; to an extreme degree.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: fele (obsolete)
  • Middle Scots: fele (poetic)

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Old English fǣle, from Proto-West Germanic *failī, from Proto-Germanic *failijaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fele (uncommon)

  1. good, excellent
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

A back-formation from felen (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fele (uncountable) (rare, Northern)

  1. The sense of touch; the capacity to feel.
  2. (by extension) Awareness, perception.
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

fele

  1. Alternative form of felawe

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

fele

  1. Alternative form of felen (to feel)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb
 
ei fele
a violin

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fiðla. Compare English fiddle.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /feːle/, [ˈfeː.lə]

NounEdit

fele f or m (definite singular fela or felen, indefinite plural feler, definite plural felene)

  1. a violin
  2. a fiddle; any form of stringed instrument

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

“fele” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fiðla.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /feːle/, [ˈfeː.lə]

NounEdit

fele f (definite singular fela, indefinite plural feler, definite plural felene)

  1. a violin
  2. a fiddle; any form of stringed instrument

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

“fele” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

fele (relative)

  1. Alternative form of fil