endurer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

endure +‎ -er

NounEdit

endurer (plural endurers)

  1. One who, or that which, endures or lasts.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French endurer, andurer, from Latin indūrāre, present active infinitive of indūrō. According to the TLFi, it was a borrowing (semi-learned), however it was attested as early as 1050. Doublet of indurer, a later borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

endurer

  1. (transitive) to endure

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin indūrāre, present active infinitive of indūrō.

VerbEdit

endurer

  1. to suffer; to endure; to undergo
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 90 (of the Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, lines 789-90:
      U li haïr u li amer
      m'irt forte paine a endurer
      Whether I hate her or I love her
      there will be great pain for me to endure.

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: endure
  • French: endurer