Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ērudītus, participle of ērudiō ‎(educate, train), from e- ‎(out of) + rudis ‎(rude, unskilled).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

erudite ‎(comparative more erudite, superlative most erudite)

  1. Learned, scholarly, with emphasis on knowledge gained from books.
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Ch. XII:
      At all events, if it involved any secret information in regard to old Roger Chillingworth, it was in a tongue unknown to the erudite clergyman, and did but increase the bewilderment of his mind.
    • 1913, Edith Wharton, The Custom of the Country, ch. 43:
      Elmer Moffatt had been magnificent, rolling out his alternating effects of humour and pathos, stirring his audience by moving references to the Blue and the Gray, convulsing them by a new version of Washington and the Cherry Tree . . ., dazzling them by his erudite allusions and apt quotations.
    • 2006, Jeff Israely, "Preaching Controversy," Time, 17 Sept.:
      Perhaps his erudite mind does not quite yet grasp how to transform his beloved scholarly explorations into effective papal politics.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

erudite ‎(plural erudites)

  1. A learned or scholarly person.

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ērudītus ‎(educated, accomplished)

AdverbEdit

ērudītē (comparative ērudītius, superlative ērudītissimē)

  1. learnedly, with erudition

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • erudite in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)
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