See also: Rude, rudé, rudě, rudę, rüde, and Rüde

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rude, from Old French rude, ruide, from Latin rudis (rough, raw, rude, wild, untilled).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude (comparative ruder, superlative rudest)

  1. Lacking in refinement or civility; bad-mannered; discourteous.
    This girl was so rude towards the cashier by screaming at him for no apparent reason.
    Karen broke up with Fred because he was often rude to her.
  2. Lacking refinement or skill; untaught; ignorant; raw.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, 2 Corinthians 11:6:
      But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 8”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Though not as shee with Bow and Quiver armd,
      But with such Gardning Tools as Are yet rude,
      Guiltless of fire had formd, or Angels brought []
    • 1767, Adam Ferguson, An Essay on the History of Civil Society:
      It might be apprehended, that among rude nations, where the means of subsistence are procured with so much difficulty, the mind could never raise itself above the consideration of this subject
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      She had one of the caves fitted up as a laboratory, and, although her appliances were necessarily rude, the results that she attained were, as will become clear in the course of this narrative, sufficiently surprising.
    • 1919, Rudyard Kipling, The Conundrum of the Workshops
      When the flush of a new-born sun fell first on Eden's green and gold,
      Our father Adam sat under the Tree and scratched with a stick in the mould;
      And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart,
      Till the Devil whispered behind the leaves, "It's pretty, but is it Art?"
    • 1983 [1981], Crowley, John, “The Fairies' Parliment”, in Little, Big, Bantam Books, →ISBN, page 583:
      There was a rude bridge there, much fallen, where floating branches caught and white water swirled; []
  3. Violent; abrupt; turbulent.
    a rude awakening
    • 1577, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 9:
      The Air attrite to Fire, as late the Clouds
      Justling or pusht with Winds rude in thir shock
  4. Somewhat obscene, pornographic, offensive.
    a rude film
    rude language
  5. Undeveloped, unskilled, inelegant.
  6. Hearty, vigorous; found particularly in the phrase rude health.
    • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Walden Pond, Economy:
      A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rudis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude (masculine and feminine plural rudes)

  1. uncultured, rough

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German rūte, from Old High German rūta (German Raute (rhomb)), probably from Latin rūta (rue).

NounEdit

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. pane
  2. window
  3. square
  4. lozenge, diamond
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Old Norse rúta, from Middle Low German rūde, from Latin rūta (rue).

NounEdit

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. (botany) rue (various perennial shrubs of the genus Ruta)
InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French rude, from Latin rudis (unwrought).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude (plural rudes)

  1. rough, harsh
    • March 28 1757, Robert-François Damiens, facing a horrific execution
      "La journée sera rude." ("The day will be rough.")
  2. tough, hard; severe
  3. bitter, harsh, sharp (of weather)
  4. crude, unpolished
  5. hardy, tough, rugged
  6. (informal) formidable, fearsome

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rūta, from Ancient Greek ῥυτή (rhutḗ).

NounEdit

rude f (plural rudis)

  1. rue, common rue (Ruta graveolens)

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rudis, rudem.

AdjectiveEdit

rude

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

ReferencesEdit

  • rude” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rudis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈru.de/
  • Rhymes: -ude
  • Hyphenation: rù‧de

AdjectiveEdit

rude (invariable)

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of rudis

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

rude

  1. Alternative form of rudden

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rudis.

AdjectiveEdit

rude m or f

  1. (Jersey) rough

Derived termsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude

  1. inflection of rudy:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rudis

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude m or f (plural rudes, comparable)

  1. rude; bad-mannered
    Synonyms: brusco, grosseiro, mal-educado

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

rude f pl

  1. plural of rudă

Serbo-CroatianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rude

  1. inflection of rud:
    1. masculine accusative plural
    2. feminine genitive singular
    3. feminine nominative/accusative/vocative plural

NounEdit

rude (Cyrillic spelling руде)

  1. inflection of ruda:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

SlovakEdit

NounEdit

rude

  1. dative/locative singular of ruda

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

rude

  1. plural of ruda