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ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aethra, from Ancient Greek αἴθρα (aíthra), akin to αἰθήρ (aithḗr, air; ether).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.tra/, [ˈɛːt̪r̺ä]
  • Hyphenation: è‧tra

NounEdit

etra m (plural etri) (poetic)

  1. air
    Synonyms: aere (poetic), aria, aura (literary, poetic), etere (poetic)
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “Ultimo canto di Saffo [Sappho's Last Song]”, in Canti[1], Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 8–11, page 40:
      Noi l’insueto allor gaudio ravviva, ¶ quando per l’etra liquido si volve ¶ e per li campi trepidanti il flutto ¶ polveroso de’ Noti
      For us an unaccustomed joy revives only when the dust-filled flow of the south-wind blows through the liquid air and over the quivering fields
  2. sky
    Synonyms: cielo, empireo (literary), etere (poetic), firmamento
    • 1813, Ugo Foscolo, “Pallade [Pallas]”, in Inno alle grazie[2], Florence, published 1848, page 68:
      Non men dell’altre gareggiante, all’etra ¶ Flora vola, e d’olezzi Iride allegra ¶ Passando, e toglie, a varïar quel peplo, ¶ I color rugiadosi.
      Competing no less than the others, Flora flies to the sky, and Iris, joyful in scents, passes by and takes out, to make that peplos varied, the dewy colors.

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ReferencesEdit

  • etra in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana