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See also: taré, Tāre, tarė, tåre, and -tare

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tare (vetch), from Old English *taru, from Proto-Germanic *tarwō (compare Dutch tarwe (wheat)), from Proto-Indo-European *dŕ̥Hweh₂ (compare Lithuanian dirvà (field), Russian дере́вня (derévnja, village, thorp), Ancient Greek δάρατος (dáratos, bread), Sanskrit दूर्वा (dū́rvā, panic grass, millet), Welsh drewg (darnel)).

NounEdit

tare (plural tares)

  1. (rare) A vetch, or the seed of a vetch (genus Vicia, esp. Vicia sativa)
  2. Any of the tufted grasses of genus Lolium; darnel.
  3. (rare, figuratively) A damaging weed growing in fields of grain.
    • Matthew 13:25 (KJV)
      But while men slept, his enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat, and went his way.
    • 1985, John Fowles, A Maggot:
      I saw as I thought an uncle and guardian who has led a sober, industrious and Christian life and finds himself obliged to look on the tares of folly in his own close kin.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Middle French tare, from Italian tara, from Arabic طَرْحَة(ṭarḥa, that which is thrown away), a derivative of طَرَحَ(ṭaraḥa, to throw (away)).[1]

NounEdit

 
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tare (plural tares)

  1. The empty weight of a container; the tare weight or unladen weight.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

tare (third-person singular simple present tares, present participle taring, simple past and past participle tared)

  1. (chiefly business and law) To take into account the weight of the container, wrapping etc. in weighting merchandise.
    • 1886, Records of the History, Laws, Regulations, and Statistics of the Tobacco Trade of the United Kingdom, p. 86,
      he is [] to tare such number of bales as may be deemed necessary to settle the net weight for duty.
  2. (sciences) To set a zero value on an instrument (usually a balance) that discounts the starting point.
    • 2003, Dany Spencer Adams, Lab Math, CSHL Press, p. 63,
      Spectrometers, for example, must be zeroed before each reading; balances must be tared before each weighing.
Usage notesEdit
  • In measuring instruments other than balances, this process is usually called zeroing.
SynonymsEdit
  • (to set a zero value): zero
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

tare

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of tear

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from Japanese 垂れ.

 
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NounEdit

tare (uncountable)

  1. Any of various dipping sauces served with Japanese food, typically based on soy sauce.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tare” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin tara or Italian tara, from Arabic طَرْح(ṭarḥ, rubbish, refuse), from طَرَحَ(ṭaraḥa, reject, deduct).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tare f (plural tares)

  1. (archaic) deficiency
  2. defect, vice, flaw
  3. tare (empty weight)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tare f

  1. plural of tara

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

tare

  1. Rōmaji transcription of たれ

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English *taru, from Proto-Germanic *tarwō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tare (plural tares or taren)

  1. Vetch or tare; a member of the genus Vicia.
  2. The seed of vetch, especially referring to something worthless.
  3. (rare) Lolium temulentum (poison darnel).

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tālem, accusative of tālis. The sense of "distinguished" or "so great / excellent" in Latin probably eventually became "strong" in earlier Romanian, finally taking on the more literal meaning of "hard" or "tough". Compare also atare.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tare m, f, n (plural tari)

  1. (of a material) hard, tough, solid
    Pâinea este foarte tare.
    The bread is very hard.
  2. (of a person) strong
  3. (of a voice) loud, strong, powerful
  4. fierce, vehement, intense, vigorous
  5. mighty, durable, lasting, sturdy
  6. (colloquial) cool

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

tare

  1. strongly
  2. quickly and well
  3. very

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

tare

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tarar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tarar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tarar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tarar.