See also: Air, AIR, áir, aïr, Aïr, 'air, air., àir., and -air

English edit

 
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A hot air balloon partially inflated with air.
 
The composition of air.

Alternative forms edit

  • aire, ayre, eyr (obsolete)
  • ayr (especially when referring to the form of music)

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English aire, from Old French air, from Latin āēr, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ (aḗr). Displaced native Old English lyft. More at lift, loft.

Noun edit

air (countable and uncountable, plural airs)

  1. (uncountable, meteorology) The substance constituting Earth's atmosphere, particularly:
    I'm going outside to get some air.
    The air on Mars is so thin that high and low temperatures on the day differ a lot.
    1. (historical, philosophy, alchemy) understood as one of the four elements of the ancient Greeks and Romans.
      Synonym: wind
    2. (historical, medicine) understood as a particular local substance with supposed effects on human health.
      • 1991 May 12, “Kidnapped!”, in Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
        Jeeves: Foreign travel often liberates emotions best kept in check, sir. The air of North America is notoriously stimulating in this regard, as witness the regrettable behavior of its inhabitants in 1776.
        B. Wooster: Hm? What happened in 1776, Jeeves?
        Jeeves: I prefer not to dwell on it, if it's convenient to you, sir.
      There was a tension in the air which made me suspect an approaching storm.
    3. (physics) understood as a gaseous mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and various trace gases.
  2. (usually with the) The apparently open space above the ground which this substance fills, (historical) formerly thought to be limited by the firmament but (meteorology) now considered to be surrounded by the near vacuum of outer space.
    The flock of birds took to the air.
  3. A breeze; a gentle wind.
  4. A feeling or sense.
    to give it an air of artistry and sophistication
    • 1900, Charles W[addell] Chesnutt, chapter I, in The House Behind the Cedars, Boston, Mass., New York, N.Y.: Houghton, Mifflin and Company [], →OCLC:
      The girl stooped to pluck a rose, and as she bent over it, her profile was clearly outlined. She held the flower to her face with a long-drawn inhalation, then went up the steps, crossed the piazza, opened the door without knocking, and entered the house with the air of one thoroughly at home.
    • 1951 October, H. A. Vallance, “Across Denmark by Lyntog”, in Railway Magazine, page 658:
      Even at the busiest periods, an air of quiet orderliness pervades the hall, and the first impression gained by the traveller is one of efficiency, neatness and cleanliness.
    • November 2 2014, Daniel Taylor, "Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
      Smalling’s quick one-two of yellow cards towards the end of the first half had left an air of inevitability about what would follow and, if anything, it was probably a surprise that City restricted themselves to Sergio Agüero’s goal bearing in mind another of United’s defenders, Marcos Rojo, was taken off on a stretcher early in the second half with a dislocated shoulder.
  5. A sense of poise, graciousness, or quality.
    • 1815 December (indicated as 1816), [Jane Austen], chapter 4, in Emma: [], volume I, London: [] [Charles Roworth and James Moyes] for John Murray, →OCLC:
      "He is very plain, undoubtedly—remarkably plain:—but that is nothing compared with his entire want of gentility. I had no right to expect much, and I did not expect much; but I had no idea that he could be so very clownish, so totally without air. I had imagined him, I confess, a degree or two nearer gentility."
  6. (usually in the plural) Pretension; snobbishness; pretence that one is better than others.
    putting on airs
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      He read the letter aloud. Sophia listened with the studied air of one for whom, even in these days, a title possessed some surreptitious allurement.
  7. (music) A song, especially a solo; an aria.
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], Pride and Prejudice: [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, [], →OCLC:
      "If I," said Mr. Collins, "were so fortunate as to be able to sing, I should have great pleasure, I am sure, in obliging the company with an air; for I consider music as a very innocent diversion, and perfectly compatible with the profession of a clergyman [] "
    • 1850, T. S. Arthur, “Deacon Smith and his Violin”, in Sketches of Life and Character[2], Philadelphia: J. W. Bradley, →OCLC, page 70:
      The lad, his son, had obtained a Jew's-harp, and learned to play upon it the profane airs of "Yankee Doodle," "Hail Columbia," "St. Patrick's Day," and "Auld Lang Syne."
  8. (informal) Nothing; absence of anything.
  9. (countable, uncountable) An air conditioner or the processed air it produces.
    Could you turn on the air?
    Hey, did you mean to leave the airs on all week while you were on vacation?
  10. (obsolete, chemistry) Any specific gas.
  11. (snowboarding, skateboarding, motor sports) A jump in which one becomes airborne.
  12. A television or radio signal; (by extension) media broadcasts in general.
    • 1996, Thomas Streeter, Selling the Air, →ISBN:
      Ernst gave a list of political activists who had been denied access to the air by private broadcasters, and pointed out that "Secretary Hoover's signature in New York sells for $150,000 to $200,000," thus limiting access to the air on the part of labor unions and other underrepresented groups.
    • 2001, Dana Stabenow, The Singing of the Dead, →ISBN, page 17:
      Coming to you live once a month, or whenever I feel like broadcasting a little pirate air.
    • 2015, Gary Andres, Paul Hernnson, Lobbying Reconsidered: Politics Under the Influence, page 149:
      “These members need air cover in the media.” Paid media is the admission ticket to enter the big-time Washington stage.
  13. (uncountable) Publicity.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Pages starting with “air”.

Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Jersey Dutch: êr
Translations edit

Verb edit

air (third-person singular simple present airs, present participle airing, simple past and past participle aired)

  1. (transitive) To bring (something) into contact with the air, so as to freshen or dry it.
  2. (transitive) To let fresh air into (a room or a building), to ventilate.
    It's getting quite stuffy in this room: let's open the windows and air it.
  3. (transitive) To give voice to, to make public (an opinion etc.).
    • 2010 February 11, Rosie Swash, “John Mayer apologises after using N-word in Playboy interview”, in The Guardian[3]:
      John Mayer has apologised for using a racist epithet in a recent interview with Playboy magazine, after a number of prominent black musicians aired their disapproval.
  4. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) To discuss varying viewpoints on a given topic.
    • 1917, National Geographic, v.31, March 1917:
      Thus, in spite of all opposition, the rural and urban assemblies retained the germ of local government, and in spite of the dual control, as the result of which much of their influence was nullified, they did have a certain value in airing abuses and suggesting improvements.
  5. (transitive) To broadcast (a television show etc.).
  6. (intransitive) To be broadcast.
    This game show first aired in the 1990s and is still going today.
  7. (transitive, Britain, MLE, slang) To ignore (a person).
    Why is this girl airing me?
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

air

  1. Pronunciation spelling of are.

Anagrams edit

Cornish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Cornish aer, aƿui(r), borrowed from Latin aer.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air m

  1. air

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French air, from Middle French air, from Old French air, from Latin āēr.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air m (plural airs, diminutive airtje n)

  1. air, pretension or pretentious attitude
  2. tune, melody

Descendants edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French air, aire, from Latin āēr.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air m (plural airs)

  1. air (gases of the atmosphere)
    trou d’airair pocket
    résistance de l’airair resistance
  2. tune, aria
  3. appearance
    avoir l’airto appear, to look, to seem
    air de famillefamily resemblance
  4. air (pretension)
    prendre des airsto put on airs
    se donner des airsgive oneself airs

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

air

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌹𐍂

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id
 
air

Etymology edit

From Malay air, from Classical Malayاير(air), from Proto-Malayic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wair, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʔä.(j)ir/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ir
  • (file)

Noun edit

air (first-person possessive airku, second-person possessive airmu, third-person possessive airnya)

  1. water
    1. clear liquid H₂O
    2. mineral water
    3. one of the four elements in alchemy
    4. one of the five basic elements in some other theories
  2. (colloquial) a cockfight round which started by spraying water to the cock.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish airid (ploughs, tills).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

air (present analytic aireann, future analytic airfidh, verbal noun ar, past participle airthe)

  1. (literary, transitive, intransitive) plough
Conjugation edit

Noun edit

air m

  1. genitive singular of ar

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (stressed) /ɛɾʲ/, (unstressed) /əɾʲ/

Pronoun edit

air (emphatic airsean)

  1. third-person singular masculine of ar (on him, on it m)

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
air n-air hair not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Kedah Malay edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wair, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air

  1. water.
    Air manis
    Sweet water

Kein edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air

  1. woman

Further reading edit

Ludian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *airo.

Noun edit

air

  1. oar

Malay edit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *air, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *wair, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

First attested in the Talang Tuo inscription, 684 AD, as Old Malay [script needed] (āir).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air (Jawi spellingاٴير⁩, informal 1st possessive airku, 2nd possessive airmu, 3rd possessive airnya)

  1. water (liquid H2O)
    • 2012, Faridah Abdul Rashid, Research on the Early Malay Doctors : 1900-1957 : Malaya and Singapore [4]
      loji rawatan air
      water treatment plant

Alternative forms edit

  • aek (Pontianak)
  • aer (Medan)
  • ayer (obsolete, surviving in place names)
  • ayar

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Baba Malay: aye
  • Indonesian: air

References edit

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary
  • Pijnappel, Jan (1875), “اير ajar”, in Maleisch-Hollandsch woordenboek, John Enschede en Zonen, Frederik Muller, page 86
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1901), “اير ayer or ayar”, in A Malay-English dictionary (romanised), Hong Kong: Kelly & Walsh limited, page 64
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1932), “ayer”, in A Malay-English dictionary (romanised), volume I, Mytilene, Greece: Salavopoulos & Kinderlis, page 56-7

Further reading edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Latin āēr.

Noun edit

air m (plural airs)

  1. air (mixture of gases that make up the earth's atmosphere)

Related terms edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin āēr.

Noun edit

air oblique singularm (oblique plural airs, nominative singular airs, nominative plural air)

  1. air (mixture of gases that make up the earth's atmosphere)

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From the same root as ar (for, preposition).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

air

  1. for (because, since)

For quotations using this term, see Citations:air.

Old Javanese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiR, compare Malay air.

Noun edit

air

  1. water
    Synonyms: bañu, jahnī, jala, salila, tīrtha, toya, uda, wari, wwe

Alternative forms edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • "air" in P.J. Zoetmulder with the collaboration of S.O. Robson, Old Javanese-English Dictionary. 's-Gravenhage: M. Nijhoff, 1982.

Pohnpeian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

air

  1. (transitive) to strip off, as when stripping insulation off a wire
  2. (transitive) to wipe off a ropelike object by drawing it through one's hand or fingers
    Air mahs keleuen.
    Please wipe the sap off the hibiscus bast.

Scots edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English air, from Old French air, from Latin āēr.

Noun edit

air (uncountable)

  1. air, atmosphere
Derived terms edit

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Icelandic ar (mote, speck of dust).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

air (plural airs)

  1. (Orkney, Shetland, Caithness, Banff) A small quantity, particle, morsel; pinch (of snuff); whiff; taste

References edit

Etymology 3 edit

Perhaps from air. See above.

Verb edit

air (third-person singular simple present airs, present participle airin, simple past aired, past participle aired)

  1. (Orkney) to taste

References edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Middle English ore, from Old English ār, from Proto-West Germanic *airu.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

air (plural airs)

  1. (Orkney, Caithness, Northern) oar

References edit

Etymology 5 edit

Derived from Old Norse eyrr.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

air (plural airs)

  1. (Orkney, Shetland) gravelly beach

References edit

Etymology 6 edit

From Middle English eire, from Old French eire, from Latin iter (journey).

Noun edit

air (plural airs)

  1. (obsolete) eyre

References edit

Etymology 7 edit

From Middle English er, from Old English ǣr, from Proto-West Germanic *airi.

Alternative forms edit

Adverb edit

air (not comparable)

  1. early

Adjective edit

air (not comparable)

  1. early

References edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɛrʲ/
  • (Lewis, South Uist) IPA(key): [ɛð]
  • (South Barra, Vatersay) IPA(key): [ɛr̝]

Etymology 1 edit

From a conflation of three Old Irish prepositions:

  1. ar, air (for) (triggering lenition), from Proto-Celtic *ɸare (in front of), from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥h₂i. Cognates include Ancient Greek παρά (pará, beside) and English fore.
  2. for (on) (triggering no mutation), from Proto-Celtic *uɸor (over, on) (compare Welsh ar, Breton war), from Proto-Indo-European *upér (compare Latin super, Ancient Greek ὑπέρ (hupér), Old English ofer).
  3. íar (after) (triggering eclipsis), from Proto-Celtic *eɸirom (after, behind), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁epi.

Cognates include Irish ar and Manx er.

Preposition edit

air (+ dative, triggers lenition in certain established phrases)

  1. on, upon
    air bàrr a' bhallaon top of the wall
    tha mi air an rathadI'm on my way
    air m' fhacal, chan innis mi dhion my word, I will not tell her
    beag air bheaglittle by little (literally, “little on little”)
  2. in (certain geographical contexts)
    air a' Ghàidhealtachdin the Highlands
    air an dùthaichin the countryside
  3. of, concerning
    iomradh air do ghliocasa report of thy wisdom
  4. by
    air ainmby name
  5. (idiomatic) Used to indicate inalienable possession, feelings and minor medical conditions
    dè an t-ainm a tha ort?what's your name? (literally, “what the name that is on you?”)
    tha an t-acras ormI'm hungry (literally, “the hunger is on me”)
    tha falt dubh orrathey have black hair (literally, “black hair is on them”)
    tha an cnatan oirreshe has a bad cold (literally, “the cold is on her”)
  6. for, on account of, by means of, through, within (triggers lenition)
    air an adhbhar sinfor that reason
    air bheag de làitheanwithin a few days
  7. Used with a verbal noun to indicate a state (triggers lenition)
    bha mi air bhoil às dèidh dhomh siud fhaicinnI was enraged after I saw that
    bhiomaid air chall nan robh sinn anns a' choille udwe'd be lost if we were in that forest
    thèid mi air chèilidh air mo sheanmhairI will visit my grandmother
  8. (in conjunction with the verb bi) must, have to
    tha e air ri phàigheadhhe has to pay (literally, “it is on him to pay”)
  9. (in one common phrase) or (triggers lenition)
    rud air choreiginsomething or other
  10. Used with a verbal noun to indicate the perfect tense; after
    tha mi air an obair a dhèanamhI have done the work (literally, “I am after the work its doing”)
    bha iad uile air falbh sa mhadainnthey had all left in the morning (literally, “they were all after leaving in the morning”)
    bhithinn air faighinn às leisI would have gotten away with it (literally, “I would be after getting away with it”)
Inflection edit
Personal inflection of air
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st orm ormsa
2nd ort ortsa
3rd m air airsan
3rd f oirre oirrese
Plural 1st oirnn oirnne
2nd oirbh oirbhse
3rd orra orrasan
Derived terms edit

Pronoun edit

air

  1. third-person singular masculine of air: on him, on it

Etymology 2 edit

Reduced form of thar.

Alternative forms edit

Preposition edit

air (+ genitive, triggers lenition)

  1. form of thar; rarely used outwith the old counting system
    deich air fhicheadthirty (literally, “ten over twenty”)
    a' dol air beinngoing over a mountain
Usage notes edit
  • The rule that this preposition governs the genitive is inconsistent.
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “air”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “air”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN
  • MacLennan, Malcolm (1925) A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Edinburgh: J. Grant, →OCLC

Veps edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *airo.

Noun edit

air

  1. oar

Declension edit

Inflection of air (inflection type 1/ilo)
nominative sing. air
genitive sing. airon
partitive sing. airod
partitive plur. airoid
singular plural
nominative air airod
accusative airon airod
genitive airon airoiden
partitive airod airoid
essive-instructive airon airoin
translative airoks airoikš
inessive airos airoiš
elative airospäi airoišpäi
illative airoho airoihe
adessive airol airoil
ablative airolpäi airoilpäi
allative airole airoile
abessive airota airoita
comitative aironke airoidenke
prolative airodme airoidme
approximative I aironno airoidenno
approximative II aironnoks airoidennoks
egressive aironnopäi airoidennopäi
terminative I airohosai airoihesai
terminative II airolesai airoilesai
terminative III airossai
additive I airohopäi airoihepäi
additive II airolepäi airoilepäi

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

air

  1. Soft mutation of gair.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gair air ngair unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.