See also: ārte

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ars.

NounEdit

arte m or f (plural artes)

  1. art

BasqueEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Basque *arte (oak). Compare Aquitanian *arte, *arta.

NounEdit

arte inan

  1. oak (especially the evergreen oak)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Basque *arte (space in between).

NounEdit

arte inan

  1. space in between
  2. interval

PostpositionEdit

arte (+ absolutive case, allative case)

  1. between
  2. until

ReferencesEdit

  • arte” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • arte” in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • arte” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German arten. Derived from the noun Art (Danish art).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /artə/, [ˈɑːd̥ə]

VerbEdit

arte (past tense artede, past participle artet)

  1. (reflexive) to behave
    Synonym: te

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ars.

NounEdit

arte f (plural artes)

  1. art

HiligaynonEdit

NounEdit

árte

  1. art, skill
  2. artifice

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin artem, accusative form of ars (art”, “skill), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís, from the root *h₂er- (to join, put together).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈar.te/, [ˈär̺t̪e̞]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: àr‧te

NounEdit

arte f (plural arti)

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  1. art

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinoEdit

NounEdit

arte (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling ארטי‎)

  1. art

LatinEdit

NounEdit

arte

  1. ablative singular of ars

AdjectiveEdit

arte

  1. vocative masculine singular of artus

ReferencesEdit

  • arte in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • arte in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

arte

  1. Alternative form of art ((area of) knowledge)

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ars, artis (“practical skill”), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arte f (plural artes)

  1. art

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:arte.

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

NounEdit

arte f pl

  1. plural of artă

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ars (practical skill) (genitive singular artis).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arte m or f (plural artes)

  1. art
  2. skill

Usage notesEdit

The gender may be masculine or feminine. In some fixed expressions it is masculine, as in arte abstracto (abstract art), while in others feminine, as in arte poética (poetry) and bellas artes (fine arts).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Basque: arte
  • Hiligaynon: arte
  • Ilocano: arte
  • Tagalog: arte
  • Waray-Waray: arte

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish arte.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ar‧te

NounEdit

árte

  1. art
    Synonym: sining
  2. dramatics; melodramatics; theatrics
  3. pretentiousness; gaudiness
Derived termsEdit

TaraoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

arte

  1. chicken (animal)

ReferencesEdit

  • 2002, Chungkham Yashwanta Singh, Tarao Grammar

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

arte m (invariable)

  1. tool, implement, gadget
  2. thing, object