See also: Skye, Sky, SKY, ský, -sky, and -ský

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
A blue sky (sense 1).

The noun is derived from Middle English ski, skie, sky (firmament, heavens, sky; cloud; cloud of mist or vapour; fog, mist; (astrology) certain configuration of the heavens; (astronomy) sphere of the celestial realm; (physiology) cloudiness, smoky residue (for example, in urine)) [and other forms],[1] from Old Norse ský (cloud), from Proto-Germanic *skiwją (cloud; sky), from *skiwô (cloud; cloud cover, haze; sky) (whence Old English sċēo (cloud) and Middle English skew (air; sky; (rare) cloud)), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover; to conceal, hide).[2]

The verb is derived from the noun.[3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sky (plural skies)

  1. The atmosphere above a given point, especially as visible from the surface of the Earth as the place where the sun, moon, stars, and clouds are seen.
    Synonyms: blue, firmament, heaven, (chiefly Scotland) lift, (literary or poetic, archaic) welkin
    That year, a meteor fell from the sky.
  2. With a descriptive word: the part of the sky which can be seen from a specific place or at a specific time; its climate, condition, etc.
    I lay back under a warm Texas sky.
    We’re not sure how long the cloudy skies will last.
  3. (chiefly literary and poetic, archaic) Usually preceded by the: the abode of God or the gods, angels, the souls of deceased people, etc.; heaven; also, powers emanating from heaven.
    This mortal has incurred the wrath of the skies.
  4. Ellipsis of sky blue
  5. (mathematics, theoretical physics) The set of all lightlike lines (or directions) passing through a given point in space-time.
    Synonym: celestial sphere
  6. (obsolete, informal, rare) In an art gallery: the upper rows of pictures that cannot easily be seen; also, the place where such pictures are hung.
  7. (obsolete) A cloud. [13th–16th c.]

Usage notesEdit

The word can be used correctly in either the singular or plural form, but the plural is now mainly poetic.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See sky/translations § Noun.

VerbEdit

sky (third-person singular simple present skies, present participle skying, simple past and past participle skied or skyed)

  1. (transitive)
    1. (informal) To drink (a beverage) from a container without one's lips touching the container.
    2. (informal, dated) To hang (a picture on exhibition) near the top of a wall, where it cannot easily be seen; (by extension) to put (something) in an undesirable place.
      Antonym: floor
    3. (slang, dated) To toss (something) upwards; specifically, to flip (a coin).
      • 1894, C[ornelis] Stoffel, “Preface”, in Studies in English, Written and Spoken: For the Use of Continental Students (First Series), Zutphen, Gelderland, Netherlands: W. J. Thieme & Co.; London: Luzac & Co., OCLC 459085826, footnote 1, page IX:
        In ‘skying’ a coin for the purpose of deciding a point at issue between two parties, two methods are in vogue: there is either the ‘slow torture’ of spinning the coin thrice, the decision to go against the tosser-up, if the other party, twice out of the three times, guesses right on which side the coin shall fall; or, the ‘sudden death’ method in which one toss is decisive; []
    4. (sports)
      1. To clear (a high jump bar, hurdle, etc.) by a large margin.
      2. (ball games) To hit, kick, or throw (a ball) extremely high.
    5. (obsolete) To raise (the price of an item on auction, or the level of the bids generally) by bidding high.
  2. (intransitive)
    1. To move quickly, as if by flying; to fly; also, to escape, to flee (especially by airplane).
    2. (sports)
      1. (ball games) To hit, kick, or throw a ball extremely high.
      2. (rowing) To raise an oar too high above the water.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ skī(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “sky, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2021; “sky, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ sky, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “sky, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): [ˈskyˀ]

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schūwe, schū, from Proto-West Germanic *skeuh, cf. English shy and German scheu

AdjectiveEdit

sky (neuter sky, plural and definite singular attributive sky)

  1. shy
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją (cloud, cloud cover), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover, conceal).

NounEdit

sky c (singular definite skyen, plural indefinite skyer)

  1. cloud
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From French jus, from Latin iūs (gravy, broth, sauce). The Danish word was probably borrowed via German Jus or Schü, pronounced IPA(key): [ˈʃyː], with a regular substitution of German /ʃ/ with Danish /sk/.

NounEdit

sky c (singular definite skyen, not used in plural form)

  1. gravy, stock (a kind of soup)
  2. jelly (made of gravy)
  3. (cooking) aspic

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schūwen, derived from the adjective.

VerbEdit

sky (imperative sky, present skyr or skyer, past skyede, past participle skyet)

  1. To shun.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją. Doublet of skew.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sky (plural skyes)

  1. The atmosphere or sky; that which lies above the ground.
  2. A cloud or mist (mass of water droplets).
  3. (rare, astronomy) A certain layout or part of the sky.
  4. (rare, physiology) Clouds in urine.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: sky
  • Scots: sky, skie, skey, ske
  • Yola: skee

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German schuwe

AdjectiveEdit

sky (neuter singular sky, definite singular and plural sky or skye, comparative skyere, indefinite superlative skyest, definite superlative skyeste)

  1. shy
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją (cloud, cloud cover), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover, conceal).

NounEdit

sky f or m (definite singular skya or skyen, indefinite plural skyer, definite plural skyene)

  1. cloud
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schuwen

VerbEdit

sky (imperative sky, present tense skyr, simple past skydde, past participle skydd, present participle skyende)

  1. To avoid, shun.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German schuwe

AdjectiveEdit

sky (neuter singular sky, definite singular and plural sky or skye, comparative skyare, indefinite superlative skyast, definite superlative skyaste)

  1. shy

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse ský. Akin to English sky.

NounEdit

sky f (definite singular skya, indefinite plural skyer, definite plural skyene)

  1. cloud
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Possibly from Middle Low German schuwen

VerbEdit

sky (present tense skyr, past tense skydde, past participle skydd or skytt, passive infinitive skyast, present participle skyande, imperative sky)

  1. To avoid, shun.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skȳ n

  1. cloud
  2. sky

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sky, from Old Norse ský.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sky (plural skies)

  1. sky
    It's a fair braw sky we'v got the nicht. It's quite a beautiful sky we've got tonight.
  2. daylight (especially at dawn)
    A wis up afore the sky. I was up before sunrise.
  3. skyline, outline against the sky (especially of a hill)
    He saw the sky o a hill awa tae the west. He saw the outline of a hill in the west.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

sky (third-person singular present skies, present participle skies, past skyin, past participle skiet)

  1. (of weather) To clear up.
  2. To shade the eyes with the hand (so as to see better).
  3. To hold up to the light and examine.

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish skȳ, from Old Norse ský, from Proto-Germanic *skiwją, compare English sky.

NounEdit

sky c

  1. (countable) heaven
  2. (countable) sky
  3. (countable) cloud
DeclensionEdit
Declension of sky 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sky skyn skyar skyarna
Genitive skys skyns skyars skyarnas

Etymology 2Edit

From French jus.

NounEdit

sky c

  1. (uncountable, cooking) The liquid that remains in a frying pan after the fried meat is ready.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German schǖwen, ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *skiuhijan.

VerbEdit

sky (present skyr, preterite skydde, supine skytt, imperative sky)

  1. To avoid (due to fear or disgust), shun.
ConjugationEdit