English

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Etymology

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From Middle English exoneraten (attested in past participle exonerated), from Latin exonerāt-, the participle stem of exonerāre, from exonerō (to discharge, unload; to exonerate), from ex- (prefix denoting privation) + onerō (to burden, lade; to load) (from onus (burden, load), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃énh₂os (burden, load), from *h₃enh₂- (to charge, onerate)). The English word is cognate with French exonérer.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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exonerate (third-person singular simple present exonerates, present participle exonerating, simple past and past participle exonerated)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To relieve (someone or something) of a load; to unburden (a load).
  2. (obsolete, reflexive) Of a body of water: to discharge or empty (itself).
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition II, section ii, member 3, page 231:
      I would examine the Caſpian Sea, and ſee where and how it exonerates it ſelfe, after it hath taken in Volga, Iaxares, Oxus, and thoſe great rivers; at the mouth of Oby, or where?
  3. (transitive) To free (someone) from an obligation, responsibility or task.
  4. (transitive) To free (someone) from accusation or blame.
    Synonyms: acquit, exculpate; see also Thesaurus:acquit

Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective

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exonerate

  1. (archaic) Freed from an obligation; freed from accusation or blame; acquitted, exonerated.

Latin

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Verb

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exonerāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of exonerō

Spanish

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Verb

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exonerate

  1. second-person singular voseo imperative of exonerar combined with te