See also: ex, Ex, ex., and -ex

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English, from words borrowed from Middle French; from Latin ex (out of, from), from Proto-Indo-European *eǵ-, *eǵs- (out), *eǵʰs. Cognate with Ancient Greek ἐξ (ex, out of, from), Transalpine Gaulish ex- (out), Old Irish ess- (out), Old Church Slavonic изъ (izŭ, out), Russian из (iz, from, out of).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (hyphened always) /ɛks/
  • IPA(key): (unhyphened with primary or secondary stress) /ɛks/, (before a vowel) /ɛɡz/
  • IPA(key): (unhyphened unstressed) /ɪks/, (before a vowel) /ɪɡz/

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. out of
    borrowed from Latin: extract, expel, except, expression, exclusion
  2. outside
    ex-directory; borrowed from Latin: exterior
  3. former
    ex-husband, ex-president, ex-wife
    • 1969 December 7, “Full Frontal Nudity”, in Monty Python's Flying Circus[1], season 1, episode 8, spoken by Mr Praline (John Cleese), Dead Parrot sketch:
      This parrot is no more. It has ceased to be. It's expired and gone to see its maker. This is a late parrot. It's a stiff. Bereft of life, it rests in peace. If you hadn't nailed it to the perch it would be pushing up the daisies. It's run down the curtain and joined the choir invisible. This is an ex-parrot.
  4. (biology) Lacking.
    excaudate, exstipulate

Usage notes edit

  • Sometimes the x in ex- is elided before certain constants, being reduced to e- (as, e.g., in ejaculate and egregious which are borrowed from Latin).
  • Words derived from ex- in the sense of former are usually formed with a hyphen. Using hyphen is recommended by GPO manual.[1]

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Derived words without entries:

  • ex-actor
  • ex-athlete
  • ex-Beatle
  • ex-boss
  • ex-CEO
  • ex-CFO
  • ex-Christian
  • ex-colleague
  • ex-consul
  • ex-councillor
  • ex-Czar
  • ex-dictator
  • ex-director
  • ex-doctor
  • ex-drummer
  • ex-emperor
  • ex-employee
  • ex-fighter
  • ex-fighter pilot
  • ex-friend
  • ex-governor
  • ex-guitarist
  • ex-Hindu
  • ex-Jesuit
  • ex-Jew
  • ex-Jewish
  • ex-judge
  • ex-Kaiser
  • ex-lover
  • ex-manager
  • ex-mayor
  • ex-minister
  • ex-Muslim
  • ex-official
  • ex-organ grinder
  • ex-piano player
  • ex-pilot
  • ex-policeman
  • ex-police officer
  • ex-praetor
  • ex-priest
  • ex-programmer
  • ex-scientist
  • ex-Scientologist
  • ex-senator
  • ex-sergeant
  • ex-soldier
  • ex-statistician
  • ex-student

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ 6. Compounding Rules in U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual, govinfo.gov

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • ex- in Slovník afixů užívaných v češtině, 2017

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French ex-, from Latin ex-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɛks/
  • (file)

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former, but still living)

Derived terms edit

French edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)
    ex- + ‎femme → ‎ex-femme

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)
  2. ex- (out)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • ex-” in Duden online

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • ex- in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2024)

Italian edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex-

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ē- (before b, d, g, j, l, m, n, r, or v)
  • ec-, ef- (before f)

Etymology edit

The preposition ex, ē used in combination.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. out, away
    ē- + ‎veniō → ‎ēveniō
    ex- + ‎clāmō (call, shout) → ‎exclāmō (call out, exclaim)
    ex- + ‎ (go) → ‎exeō (exit, depart)
  2. throughout
    ē- + ‎dormiō → ‎ēdormiō
    ē- + ‎pōtō (drink) → ‎ēpōtō (drink up)
  3. (intensive) thoroughly
    ē- + ‎dūrus → ‎ēdūrō
    ex- + ‎acuō → ‎exacuō
  4. denoting achievement
    ex- + ‎ōrō → ‎exōrō
    ex- + ‎pugnō (battle, fight, combat) → ‎expugnō (capture, conquer)
  5. up
    ex- + ‎aggerō → ‎exaggerō
    ex- + ‎struō (pile, arrange) → ‎exstruō (heap up, build up, construct)
  6. denoting privation
    ex- + ‎anima (air, breath, soul, life) → ‎exanimō (deprive of air, deprive of life)
    ex- + ‎sanguis (blood) → ‎exsanguis (deprived of blood, bloodless)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • French: é-
  • Italian: s-, es-
  • Old Occitan:
  • Portuguese: es-, ex-
  • Sicilian: s- (before consonant), sc- (before vowel)
  • Spanish: es-

References edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. privation
    ef- + ‎flouren → ‎efflouren

Derived terms edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin ex.

Pronunciation edit

 

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)

Usage notes edit

Always used with a hyphen.

Derived terms edit

Slovak edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)

Derived terms edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ex.

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex- (former)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Prefix edit

ex-

  1. ex-, former, past

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit