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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the participle stem of Latin expatior, from ex- + spatior (walk about).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛkˈspeɪʃɪeɪt/

VerbEdit

expatiate (third-person singular simple present expatiates, present participle expatiating, simple past and past participle expatiated)

  1. (now rare) To range at large, or without restraint.
    • (Can we date this quote by Alexander Pope?)
      Bids his free soul expatiate in the skies.
  2. To write or speak at length; to be copious in argument or discussion, to descant.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 35
      Now, as the business of standing mast-heads, ashore or afloat, is a very ancient and interesting one, let us in some measure expatiate here.
    • (Can we date this quote by Addison?)
      He expatiated on the inconveniences of trade.
    • 1992 May 3, "Comrade Bingo" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 3, Episode 6:
      B.W. Wooster: If you ask me, art is responsible for most of the trouble in the world.
      R. Jeeves: An interesting theory, sir. Would you care to expatiate upon it?
      B.W. Wooster: As a matter of fact, no, Jeeves. The thought just occurred to me, as thoughts do.
      R. Jeeves: Very good, sir.
    • 2007, Clive James, Cultural Amnesia (Picador 2007, p. 847)
      “It can't fly,” he expatiated. “It can move forward only by hopping.”
  3. (obsolete) To expand; to spread; to extend; to diffuse; to broaden.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.