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Particularly: “From sarcastic intonation?”

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NounEdit

faan (plural faans)

  1. (dated, fandom slang, often derogatory) A fan who is more interested in fandom than in the subject of that fandom.
    • 1956 November-December, Eney, Richard "Dick" Harris, “Fancyclopedia II: Why There Isn't Any”, in Science-Fiction Five-Yearly[1], number 2, page 40:
      In 1953 neofan Richard Eney mentioned casually (in the course of describing life as a faan in the Army) that he carried in the pocket of his lab jacket a notebook in which he was collecting subjects for a revised Fancyclopedia. [...] in Minneapolis, Belfast, and the wilds of central Hokkaido diligent faaans began to set down their understanding of things fanatic ...
    • 1969, Warner, Jr., Harry, All Our Yesterdays, page 242:
      More evidence of how fans were becoming faans can be deduced from the activities. The first day consisted of playing records, listening to Liebscher play the piano, playing games, and talking until 4 a.m.
    • 2012, Hamilton, Alex, “Science Fiction and Fantasy”, in Writing Talk, →ISBN:
      According to Colin Lester, editor of the International Science Fiction Yearbook, a fan, or to give him his full title, a "sercon fan", is serious and constructive, whereas a "faan" contributes chiefly his presence and a taste for signed copies. He did not say that this was actually destructive, though it may be, as in the case of one on Friday night who tried to pitch his tent in the lobby because it was raining outside.

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