EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Handheld fans.
An electrical fan.
A ceiling fan.

From Middle English fan, from Old English fann (a winnowing, fan), from Latin vannus (fan for winnowing grain), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Cognate with Latin ventus (wind), Dutch wan (fan), German Wanne, Swedish vanna (a fan for winnowing), Old English windwian (to fan, winnow). More at winnow.

NounEdit

fan (plural fans)

  1. A hand-held device consisting of concertinaed material, or slats of material, gathered together at one end, that may be opened out into the shape of a sector of a circle and waved back and forth in order to move air towards oneself and cool oneself.
  2. An electrical or mechanical device for moving air, used for cooling people, machinery, etc.
  3. The action of fanning; agitation of the air.
    • 1998, Brock Thoene, Bodie Thoene, A New Frontier: Saga of the Sierras (page 181)
      "If I cannot be of service, then I certainly don't wish to impose," said McGinty, with a quick fan of breeze that indicated a sweeping bow.
  4. Anything resembling a hand-held fan in shape, e.g., a peacock’s tail.
  5. An instrument for winnowing grain, by moving which the grain is tossed and agitated, and the chaff is separated and blown away.
  6. A small vane or sail, used to keep the large sails of a smock mill always in the direction of the wind.
  7. (mathematics) A section of a tree having a finite number of branches
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

fan (third-person singular simple present fans, present participle fanning, simple past and past participle fanned)

  1. (transitive) To blow air on (something) by means of a fan (hand-held, mechanical or electrical) or otherwise.
    We enjoyed standing at the edge of the cliff, being fanned by the wind.
  2. (transitive) To slap (a behind, especially).
    • 1934, Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, Bantam, published 1992, →ISBN, page 148:
      Part of it was that as much as I respected filial devotion and as much as I liked Sarah Barstow, it would have been a real satisfaction to put her across my knees and pull up her skirts and giver[sic] her a swell fanning, for not taking a look at that driver.
  3. (intransitive, usually to fan out) To move or spread in multiple directions from one point, in the shape of a hand-held fan.
  4. (transitive) To dispel by waving a hand-held fan.
    I attempted to fan the disagreeable odour out of the room.
  5. (firearms, transitive) To perform a maneuver that involves flicking the top rear of an old-style gun.
    • 2011, Hans-Christoan Vortisch, GURPS Tactical Shooting, page 14:
      To fan a single action revolver, hold down the trigger and strike the hammer repeatedly with a free hand.
  6. (metaphoric) To invigorate, like flames when fanned.
    • 1923, Arthur Symons, Love's Cruelty, page 43:
      She comes, to fan my ardour, She kills me with her kisses.
  7. To winnow grain.
    • 1856, Lelièvre, François Réal Angers, Lower Canada reports:
      By the first article, these fanning mills were appointed to be sent to the proprietors of the mills of Sault-à-la puce, Petit-Pré, Beauport, Pointe de Lévy, St. Nicolas and Ste. Famille in the isle of Orleans " to have all the wheat in general of whatever quality sent to these mills passed and fanned, before converting them into flour."
  8. (rail transport, transitive) To apply (the air brake) many times in rapid succession.
    Fanning the brakes results in the gradual depletion of the pressure in the cars' brake reservoirs, which can eventually cause a loss of all braking.
  9. (baseball, intransitive) To strike out.
  10. (baseball, transitive) To strike out (a batter).
Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • (to firing a revolver by holding trigger and hitting hammer) thumbing
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Football/soccer fans in Argentina.
Star Trek fans in the United States.
Rolling Stones fans in Norway.
A group of Beatles fans imitating the way that the band members were crossing the street at the cover of LP Abbey Road.

Clipping of fanatic, originally in US baseball slang. Possibly influenced by fancy (group of sport or hobby enthusiasts), fancy boy (fan), &c.

NounEdit

fan (plural fans or fen)

  1. A person who is fond of something or someone, especially an admirer of a performer or aficionado of a sport.
    I am a big fan of libraries.
Usage notesEdit

The plural fen is only used within science fiction fandom. See fen, etymology 3, for more information.

SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: fan
  • Finnish: fani
  • French: fan
  • German: Fan
  • Italian: fan
  • Japanese: ファン
  • Korean: (paen)
  • Norwegian Bokmål: fan, fans
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: fan, fans
  • Polish: fan
  • Portuguese:
  • Romanian: fan
  • Spanish: fan
  • Swedish: fan
  • Thai: แฟน (fɛɛn)
ReferencesEdit
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fan”, in Online Etymology Dictionary, retrieved 1 January 2017: “1889, American English, originally of baseball enthusiasts, probably a shortening of fanatic, but it may be influenced by the fancy, a collective term for followers of a certain hobby or sport (especially boxing)”.

AnagramsEdit


BambaraEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

fan

  1. egg

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fan

  1. direction, side

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of fer

ChibchaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan

  1. Alternative form of ban

ReferencesEdit

  • Gómez Aldana D. F., Análisis morfológico del Vocabulario 158 de la Biblioteca Nacional de Colombia. Grupo de Investigación Muysccubun. 2013.
  • Quesada Pacheco, Miguel Ángel. 1991. El vocabulario mosco de 1612. En estudios de Lingüística Chibcha. Programa de investigación del departamento de lingüística de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Serie Anual Tomo X San José (Costa Rica). Universidad de Costa Rica.

ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

fan

  1. church (building)
    Ka mochen fiti fan?Do you want to attend church?
  2. time (instance or occurrence)
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, →ISBN, Matthew 26:34, page 55:
      Jesus a apasa ngeni Peter, "Upwe apasa ngonuk pwe non ei chok pwinin me mwen ewe chukȯ epwe kökkö, fan unungat kopwe apasa pwe kose sinei ei."
      Jesus said to Peter, "I tell you that in this night before the chicken calls, three times you will say that you don't know me."

PrepositionEdit

fan

  1. under

CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PrepositionEdit

fan (Sette Comuni)

  1. on
    au fan tisson the table (literally, “up on table”)
  2. in
    übar fan Ròanin Canove (literally, “over in Canove”)

Usage notesEdit

Often used in conjunction with adverbs, such as au (up), übar (over), abe (down).

ReferencesEdit

  • “fan” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fan.

NounEdit

fan m (plural fans, diminutive fannetje n)

  1. fan (admirer)

SynonymsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

fan

  1. fan, admirer, aficionado

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of fan (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative fan fanit
genitive fanin fanien
partitive fania faneja
illative faniin faneihin
singular plural
nominative fan fanit
accusative nom. fan fanit
gen. fanin
genitive fanin fanien
partitive fania faneja
inessive fanissa faneissa
elative fanista faneista
illative faniin faneihin
adessive fanilla faneilla
ablative fanilta faneilta
allative fanille faneille
essive fanina faneina
translative faniksi faneiksi
instructive fanein
abessive fanitta faneitta
comitative faneineen
Possessive forms of fan (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person fanini fanimme
2nd person fanisi faninne
3rd person faninsa

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English fan, 1920s.

NounEdit

fan m or f (plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer, supporter)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English fan.

NounEdit

fan f (plural fans)

  1. (Canada) fan (ventilator)

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin famēs.

NounEdit

fan f

  1. hunger

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of facer

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

fan

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐌰𐌽

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɒn]
  • Hyphenation: fan

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *puna (hair).[1] Possibly a doublet of pina.[2]

NounEdit

fan (plural fanok)

  1. (obsolete) pubis
    Synonyms: (the region) szeméremtájék, (the bone) szeméremcsont, (mons pubis) szeméremdomb
  2. (obsolete) pubic hair
    Synonyms: szeméremszőrzet, fanszőrzet
Usage notesEdit

Today it is used only in compounds.

DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative fan fanok
accusative fant fanokat
dative fannak fanoknak
instrumental fannal fanokkal
causal-final fanért fanokért
translative fanná fanokká
terminative fanig fanokig
essive-formal fanként fanokként
essive-modal
inessive fanban fanokban
superessive fanon fanokon
adessive fannál fanoknál
illative fanba fanokba
sublative fanra fanokra
allative fanhoz fanokhoz
elative fanból fanokból
delative fanról fanokról
ablative fantól fanoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fané fanoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fanéi fanokéi
Possessive forms of fan
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fanom fanjaim
2nd person sing. fanod fanjaid
3rd person sing. fanja fanjai
1st person plural fanunk fanjaink
2nd person plural fanotok fanjaitok
3rd person plural fanjuk fanjaik
Derived termsEdit
Compound words

Etymology 2Edit

From English fan.

NounEdit

fan (plural fanok)

  1. (neologism, colloquial) fan (a person who is fond of something or someone, especially an admirer of a performer or aficionado of a sport)
    Synonym: rajongó
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative fan fanok
accusative fant fanokat
dative fannak fanoknak
instrumental fannal fanokkal
causal-final fanért fanokért
translative fanná fanokká
terminative fanig fanokig
essive-formal fanként fanokként
essive-modal
inessive fanban fanokban
superessive fanon fanokon
adessive fannál fanoknál
illative fanba fanokba
sublative fanra fanokra
allative fanhoz fanokhoz
elative fanból fanokból
delative fanról fanokról
ablative fantól fanoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fané fanoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
fanéi fanokéi
Possessive forms of fan
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. fanom fanjaim
2nd person sing. fanod fanjaid
3rd person sing. fanja fanjai
1st person plural fanunk fanjaink
2nd person plural fanotok fanjaitok
3rd person plural fanjuk fanjaik

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #811 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary. Internet Archive
  2. ^ fan in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • (pubis): fan in Czuczor, Gergely and János Fogarasi: A magyar nyelv szótára (’A Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Pest: Emich Gusztáv Magyar Akadémiai Nyomdász, 1862–1874.
  • (pubis): fan at A Pallas nagy lexikona, Pallas Irodalmi és Nyomdai Rt., Budapest, 1897
  • (pubis): László Országh, Magyar–angol szótár (“Hungarian–English Dictionary”), Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1977

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From English fan (a person who is fond of something or someone), clipping of fanatic.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛn]
  • Hyphenation: fan

NounEdit

fan (first-person possessive fanku, second-person possessive fanmu, third-person possessive fannya)

  1. fan: a person who is fond of something or someone.
    Synonyms: pengagum, penggemar

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish fanaid, from Old Irish anaid (to stay, remain, abide).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fan (present analytic fanann, future analytic fanfaidh, verbal noun fanacht, past participle fanta)

  1. to wait
  2. to stay

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fan fhan bhfan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fāmes.

NounEdit

fan

  1. hunger

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fan.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan m or f (plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer or follower)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ fan in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

KanuriEdit

VerbEdit

fàn+

  1. hear
  2. understand
  3. feel

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

fan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English fann, from Latin vannus. Forms in v- are due to a combination of Southern Middle English voicing of initial fricatives and influence from the ultimate Latin etymon.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan (plural fannes)

  1. A mechanism or device for removing chaff from grain (i.e. winnowing).
  2. A training or practice shield manufactured out of twigs or wickerwork.
  3. (rare) A fan; a device for blowing air as to cool.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

fan

  1. Alternative form of fannen

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English fan, where it was a clipping of fanatic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan m (definite singular fanen, indefinite plural fans, definite plural fanane)

  1. (countable) a fan (person who is fond of someone or something)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fan m

  1. (swear word, in juxtapositions) Alternative form of faen
    Han er ein feig fan.
    He's a wimpy fucker.

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of faire

Old DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *fanē.

PrepositionEdit

fan

  1. off, from
DescendantsEdit
Further readingEdit
  • fan”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *fą̄han.

VerbEdit

fān

  1. to catch
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
Further readingEdit
  • fān”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, whence also Old High German fon.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

fan

  1. from

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fan.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan m pers (feminine fanka)

  1. fan (admirer)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fan in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RohingyaEdit

NounEdit

fan

  1. betel leaf

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish anaid, fanaid (stays, remains, abides).

VerbEdit

fan (past dh'fhan, future fanaidh, verbal noun fantail or fantainn or fanachd)

  1. stay, remain
  2. wait

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fan.

NounEdit

fan m or f (plural fans or fanes)

  1. fan
    Ella es una gran fan tuya.She's a big fan of yours.
    Synonyms: aficionado, admirador, entusiasta, fanático, hincha

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Old Norse fendinn, perhaps from Old Frisian fandiand, present participle of fandia (tempt), from Proto-Germanic *fandōną (seek, search for, examine). Cognate with Danish fanden and Norwegian Bokmål faen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaːn/, /ˈfaːˌa(ː)n/

NounEdit

fan c

  1. the devil, Satan
    fan ta dig.
    May the devil take you.
    Du var mig en jobbig fan.
    You're one tricky little devil.

InterjectionEdit

fan

  1. damn (referring to the devil)
    Fan! Jag glömde nycklarna.
    Damn! I forgot my keys.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English fan, short for fanatic, related to the Swedish words fanatisk and fanatiker.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fan c or n

  1. fan (admirer)
    jag är ett stort fan av saffransbullar
    I'm a huge fan of saffron buns
DeclensionEdit
Declension of fan 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fan fanet fans fansen
Genitive fans fanets fans fansens

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Low German fan, used since 1772, closely related to Swedish fana (flag).

NounEdit

fan n

  1. vane, web (part of the anatomy of a bird's feather)
DeclensionEdit
Declension of fan 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fan fanet fan fanen
Genitive fans fanets fans fanens

TboliEdit

NounEdit

fan

  1. bait

UzbekEdit

 
Uzbek Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uz

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic فَنّ(fann).

NounEdit

fan (plural fanlar)

  1. science

SynonymsEdit


WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English van.

NounEdit

fan f (plural faniau, not mutable)

  1. van

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fan

  1. Soft mutation of man.
MutationEdit
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
man fan unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

fan

  1. Soft mutation of ban.
MutationEdit
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
man fan unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “fan”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian fon, from Proto-Germanic *fanē.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

fan

  1. from
  2. of

Further readingEdit

  • fan (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English whanne, from Old English hwænne, from Proto-West Germanic *hwannā.

AdverbEdit

fan

  1. when?

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith