famulus

See also: Famulus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin famulus (servant).

NounEdit

famulus (plural famuli)

  1. A close attendant or assistant, especially of a magician or occult scholar.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

For Proto-Italic *famelos (slave) (whence Oscan 𐌚𐌀𐌌𐌄𐌋 (famel, slave)); probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to do, put, place). Probably as a backformation from the predecessor of familia (see there for details).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

famulus m (genitive famulī, feminine famula); second declension

  1. a servant, slave

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative famulus famulī
Genitive famulī famulōrum
Dative famulō famulīs
Accusative famulum famulōs
Ablative famulō famulīs
Vocative famule famulī

AdjectiveEdit

famulus (feminine famula, neuter famulum); first/second-declension adjective

  1. (figuratively) serving, servile

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative famulus famula famulum famulī famulae famula
Genitive famulī famulae famulī famulōrum famulārum famulōrum
Dative famulō famulō famulīs
Accusative famulum famulam famulum famulōs famulās famula
Ablative famulō famulā famulō famulīs
Vocative famule famula famulum famulī famulae famula

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (noun)famulus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • (adjective)famulus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • famulus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • famulus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette