Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From familia(household) +‎ -āris.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

familiāris m, f ‎(neuter familiāre); third declension

  1. of or pertaining to servants
  2. of or pertaining to a household or family
  3. familiar, intimate, friendly
  4. of or belonging to one's own self, country, etc.
  5. customary, habitual
  6. fitting, appropriate

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative familiāris familiāre familiārēs familiāria
genitive familiāris familiārium
dative familiārī familiāribus
accusative familiārem familiāre familiārēs familiāria
ablative familiārī familiāribus
vocative familiāris familiāre familiārēs familiāria

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

familiāris m ‎(genitive familiāris); third declension

  1. a servant, domestic
  2. a friend, familiar acquaintance

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative familiāris familiārēs
genitive familiāris familiārium
dative familiārī familiāribus
accusative familiārem familiārēs
ablative familiāre familiāribus
vocative familiāris familiārēs

ReferencesEdit

  • familiaris in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • familiaris in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.familiaris”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the ordinary usage of language, everyday speech: sermo familiaris et cotidianus
    • to keep house: rem domesticam, familiarem administrare, regere, curare
    • to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem familiarem tueri
    • to neglect, mismanage one's household matters: rem familiarem neglegere
    • to squander all one's property: dissipare rem familiarem (suam)