familia

See also: Familia, família, and famìlia

TranslingualEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin familia.

NounEdit

familia

  1. (biology, taxonomy) A category in the classification of organisms, ranking below ordo and above genus.
  2. (taxonomy) A taxon at this rank.

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin familia (family). Doublet of family.

NounEdit

familia (plural familiae)

  1. (historical) A household or religious community under one head, regarded as a unit.
    • 2007, Ada I. Engebrigtsen, Exploring Gypsiness, page 117:
      Joska's elder brother Phuro was, however, seen as the leader of his familia. As one of the oldest males in the hamlet, with a familia that consisted of sons, bora and sons-in-law, Phuro's position as head of his familia was given by his age and by his authority as father.
  2. (Roman law) The paterfamilias, his legitimate descendants and their wives, all persons adopted into his family and their wives, and all slaves belonging to the household.

AsturianEdit

 
Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin familia.

NounEdit

familia f (plural families)

  1. family

Eastern Huasteca NahuatlEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish familia.

NounEdit

familia

  1. family.

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From familio (family) +‎ -a (suffix indicating an adjective).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /famiˈlia/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧mi‧li‧a
  • Rhymes: -ia

AdjectiveEdit

familia (accusative singular familian, plural familiaj, accusative plural familiajn)

  1. familial; family (attributively)

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin familia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia f (plural familias)

  1. family

Further readingEdit


IngrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian фамилия (familija).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia (genitive familian, partitive familiaa)

  1. surname, last name

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of familia
singular plural
nominative familia familiat
genitive familian familioin
partitive familiaa familioja
illative familiaa familioihe
inessive familiaaz familioiz
elative familiast familioist
allative familialle familioille
adessive familiaal familioil
ablative familialt familioilt
translative familiaks familioiks
essive familiaan familioin

ReferencesEdit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 38
  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[1], page 98

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia (plural familias)

  1. family

LadinEdit

NounEdit

familia f (plural families)

  1. family

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *fameljā (of the house → household). In view of the semantic shift illustrated in the cognates, famulus (servant, slave) (with Oscan 𐌚𐌀𐌌𐌄𐌋 (famel, servile)) is probably a backformation from it and not the other way around. From Proto-Indo-European *dʰh₁-m-eló-m (fundament), from *dʰeh₁- (to do, put, place). Cognate to Sanskrit धामन् (dhāman, order; dwelling-place, temple; family), Ancient Greek θεμέλιος (themélios, of the foundation), θέμις (thémis, justice, law).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia f (genitive familiae); first declension

  1. a household, all persons subject to the control of one man (whether relations, freedmen or slaves)
  2. the slaves of a household, servants
  3. a group of slaves stationed in one place; a brigade, gang (used for some purpose)
    1. one's personal retinue
  4. a family, kin (a group of people closely related to one another)
    Synonym: domus
    • Vulgate, Genesis 10.32:
      Hae familiae Nōē iū̆xtā populōs et nātiōnēs suās. Ab hīs dīvīsae sunt gentēs in Terrā post dīluvium.
      These are the families of Noah, according to their peoples and tribes. From them split the nations on Earth after the deluge.
  5. an intellectual school (eg. of philosophy)
    Synonym: domus
  6. (law) an estate (sometimes distinct from pecūnia and possibly restricted to rēs mancipī)

Usage notesEdit

According to Richard Saller, “[f]amilia was never used to mean ‘father, mother and children’ in our sense of ‘family’ today. It did have a technical, legal usage akin to ‘family’, but in common parlance most often meant ‘slave staff’, exclusive of the master's family.... The usual word for ‘family’ in the classical period was domus, which carried the general sense of ‘household’ including domestic slaves.”[1]

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative familia familiae
Genitive familiae familiārum
Dative familiae familiīs
Accusative familiam familiās
Ablative familiā familiīs
Vocative familia familiae

The older genitive singular familiās is frequent in pater familiās, as well as with fīlius, māter, and fīlia.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

HolonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Borrowings

ReferencesEdit

  • familia” on page 740 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “famulus”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 200
  1. ^ Saller, Richard, Slavery and the Roman Family, in Finley, Moses I., ed., Classical Slavery (London: Frank Cass, cloth 1987 & 2000 (same ed.), reprinted 1999 →ISBN, p. 84

Further readingEdit

  • familia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • familia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • familia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • familia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a sect, school of thought: schola, disciplina, familia; secta
    • a theatrical company: familia, grex, caterva histrionum
    • a band, troupe of gladiators under the management of a lanista: familia gladiatoria (Sest. 64. 134)
  • familia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • familia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

LeoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

familia f (plural familias)

  1. family

ReferencesEdit


MòchenoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian famiglia, from Latin familia (family; household).

NounEdit

familia f

  1. family

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin familia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia f (diminutive familijka)

  1. (dated) family
    Synonym: rodzina

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • familia in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • familia in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

familia f (plural familias)

  1. Obsolete spelling of família

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia f

  1. definite singular nominative/accusative of familie

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin familia.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /faˈmilja/, [faˈmi.lja]
  • (file)

NounEdit

familia f (plural familias)

  1. family (nuclear family)
  2. family (grouping of things possessing common characteristics)

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwahiliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin familia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

familia (n class, plural familia)

  1. family
  2. (taxonomy) family