See also: fanàtic

English edit

 
Sports 'fans' or fanatics

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

First attested in 1525. From Latin fānāticus (of a temple, divinely inspired, frenzied), from fānum (temple). Influenced by French fanatique.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fanatic (comparative more fanatic, superlative most fanatic)

  1. Fanatical.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh:
      But Faith, fanatic Faith, once wedded fast / To some dear falsehood, hugs it to the last.
  2. (obsolete) Showing evidence of possession by a god or demon; frenzied, overzealous.

Translations edit

Noun edit

fanatic (plural fanatics)

  1. A person who is zealously enthusiastic for some cause, especially in religion.
    • 2010, BioWare, Mass Effect 2 (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →OCLC, PC, scene: Cerberus: The Illusive Man Codex entry:
      The reclusive tycoon calling himself the Illusive Man is a human nationalist focused on advancing human interests, whatever the cost to non-humans. The Citadel Council regards him as a fanatic posing a serious threat to galactic security.

Translations edit

See also edit

Quotations edit

  • A zealot can't change his mind. A fanatic can't change his mind and won't change the subject. —Winston Churchill (attributed)
  • A fanatic is one who redoubles his effort when he has forgotten his aim. —George Santayana

Anagrams edit

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin fānāticus, possibly via French fanatique.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fanatic m (feminine singular fanatica, masculine plural fanatics, feminine plural fanaticas)

  1. fanatical

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French fanatique, from Latin fānāticus.

Adjective edit

fanatic m or n (feminine singular fanatică, masculine plural fanatici, feminine and neuter plural fanatice)

  1. fanatic

Declension edit