fanatic

See also: fanàtic

EnglishEdit

 
Sports 'fans' or fanatics

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1525. From Latin fānāticus (of a temple, divinely inspired, frenzied), from fānum (temple). Influenced by French fanatique.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fəˈnæt.ɪk/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætɪk

AdjectiveEdit

fanatic (comparative more fanatic, superlative most fanatic)

  1. Fanatical.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      But Faith, fanatic Faith, once wedded fast / To some dear falsehood, hugs it to the last.
  2. (obsolete) Showing evidence of possession by a god or demon; frenzied, overzealous.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

fanatic (plural fanatics)

  1. A person who is zealously enthusiastic for some cause, especially in religion.
    • 2010, BioWare, Mass Effect 2 (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, OCLC 865290061, PC, scene: Cerberus: The Illusive Man Codex entry:
      The reclusive tycoon calling himself the Illusive Man is a human nationalist focused on advancing human interests, whatever the cost to non-humans. The Citadel Council regards him as a fanatic posing a serious threat to galactic security.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

QuotationsEdit

  • A zealot can't change his mind. A fanatic can't change his mind and won't change the subject. —Winston Churchill (attributed)
  • A fanatic is one who redoubles his effort when he has forgotten his aim. —George Santayana

AnagramsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fānāticus, possibly via French fanatique.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

fanatic m (feminine singular fanatica, masculine plural fanatics, feminine plural fanaticas)

  1. fanatical

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fanatique, from Latin fānāticus.

AdjectiveEdit

fanatic m or n (feminine singular fanatică, masculine plural fanatici, feminine and neuter plural fanatice)

  1. fanatic

DeclensionEdit