See also: Fass and Faß

Central Franconian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • fast (northernmost Moselle Franconian)
  • fest (most of Moselle Franconian)

Etymology edit

From Middle High German fast, from Old High German fast, from Proto-West Germanic *fast.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fass (masculine faste, feminine faste or fass, comparative faster, superlative et miets fass)

  1. (Ripuarian) firm

Usage notes edit

  • In adverbial or predicative function the superlative may also be et faste.

Derived terms edit

Jamaican Creole edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

The adjective form is likely a semantic shift of the word English fast in the dated sense of having immoral habits.[1] The verb form is instead derived from the English verb "to fuss."

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɑːs/
  • Hyphenation: fass

Adjective edit

fass

  1. Alternative spelling of fast.
    Mi cyaan ketch yuh. Yuh too fass fi mi.
    I can't catch up to you. You're too fast for me.
  2. nosy; inquisitive
    Yuh too fass. Yuh fi stay outta people business.
    You're too nosy. Don't get involved in other people's affairs.
    • 2008, Jennifer Keane-Dawes, “Dear Jamaica: Living among the dead”, in The Jamaica Gleaner[1]:
      “Mabel: "Gladys, nuh seh me fass. But wah mek yu fallah Ivan gone lib ova da cemetery?" []
      Mabel: "Gladys, please don't think I'm being inquisitive. But why did you decide to go live in the cemetery with Ivan? []

Verb edit

fass

  1. meddle in others' affairs
    Wah mek yuh a fass inna di people dem business?
    Why are you meddling in the people's affairs?
    Miss May always a fass inna people business.
    Ms. May is always meddling in other people's affairs.
    • 2010, Jennifer M. Keane-Dawes, Dear Jamaica: Expressions of Indigenous Knowledge, →ISBN, page 31:
      “Tek Iris who fa love now, is fe fass inna people bisniss. Suh everytime people see him a shoob een him hearing aid an a tep like cock chicken a come, dem know fe tikya. []
      For example, there's Iris who loves to meddle in other people's affairs. Whenever people see her putting her hearing aid in, walking over like a rooster, they know they need to be careful. []

References edit

  1. ^ Richard Allsopp, editor, Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies Press, 1996 (2003 printing), →ISBN, page 225

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English fæs; cognate to Middle High German vase.[1][2]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fass (plural fasses) (rare)

  1. fringe
  2. leek root

References edit

  1. ^ fas, n..”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 29 November 2019.
  2. ^ fā̆s, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-11-29.