See also: fáce

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English face, from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (form, appearance). Doublet of facies.

Displaced native Middle English onlete (face, countenance, appearance), anleth (face), from Old English anwlite, andwlita, compare German Antlitz; Old English ansīen (face), Middle English neb (face, nose) (from Old English nebb), Middle English ler, leor, leer (face, cheek, countenance) (from Old English hlēor), and non-native Middle English vis (face, appearance, look) (from Old French vis) and Middle English chere (face) from Old French chere.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fās, IPA(key): /feɪs/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: face
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

NounEdit

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area.
    That girl has a pretty face.
    The monkey pressed its face against the railings.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector's face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 7, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. []
  2. One's facial expression.
    Why the sad face?
  3. (in expressions such as 'make a face') A distorted facial expression; an expression of displeasure, insult, etc.
    Children! Stop making faces at each other!
  4. The public image; outward appearance.
    Our chairman is the face of this company.
    He managed to show a bold face despite his embarrassment.
  5. The frontal aspect of something.
    The face of the cliff loomed above them.
  6. An aspect of the character or nature of someone or something.
    This is a face of her that we have not seen before.
    Poverty is the ugly face of capitalism.
  7. (figuratively) Presence; sight; front.
    to fly in the face of danger
    to speak before the face of God
  8. The directed force of something.
    They turned the boat into the face of the storm.
  9. Good reputation; standing in the eyes of others; dignity; prestige. (See lose face, save face).
  10. Shameless confidence; boldness; effrontery.
    You've got some face coming round here after what you've done.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, Preface to The Works
      This is the man that has the face to charge others with false citations.
  11. Any surface, especially a front or outer one.
    Put a big sign on each face of the building that can be seen from the road.
    They climbed the north face of the mountain.
    She wanted to wipe him off the face of the earth.
  12. (geometry) Any of the flat bounding surfaces of a polyhedron. More generally, any of the bounding pieces of a polytope of any dimension.
  13. The numbered dial of a clock or watch, the clock face.
  14. (slang) The mouth.
    Shut your face!
    He's always stuffing his face with chips.
  15. (slang) Makeup; one's complete facial cosmetic application.
    I'll be out in a sec. Just let me put on my face.
  16. (metonymically) A person.
    It was just the usual faces at the pub tonight.
  17. (informal) A familiar or well-known person; a member of a particular scene, such as music or fashion scene.
    He owned several local businesses and was a face around town.
  18. (professional wrestling, slang) A headlining wrestler with a persona embodying heroic or virtuous traits and who is regarded as a "good guy", especially one who is handsome and well-conditioned; a baby face.
    The fans cheered on the face as he made his comeback.
  19. (cricket) The front surface of a bat.
  20. (golf) The part of a golf club that hits the ball.
  21. (card games) The side of the card that shows its value (as opposed to the back side, which looks the same on all cards of the deck).
  22. (heraldry) The head of a lion, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.
  23. The width of a pulley, or the length of a cog from end to end.
    a pulley or cog wheel of ten inches face
  24. (typography) A typeface.
  25. Mode of regard, whether favourable or unfavourable; favour or anger.
  26. (informal) The amount expressed on a bill, note, bond, etc., without any interest or discount; face value.
    • 1966 November, “Classified Opportunity Mart: Stamp Collecting [advertisement]”, in Popular Science Monthly, volume 189, number 5, page 229:
      MAKE Money-wholesale U.S. stamps—buy mint stamps below face. Be a dealer. Send $1.00 for two giant catalogs, refunded first order. Von Stein, Bernardsville, N.J.
    • 1995 January 18, Ed Jackson, “Re: US sheets -- Sell for how much?”, in rec.collecting.stamps, Usenet[2]:
      With certain exceptions for valuable stamps, dealers and many collectors are only willing to offer a percentage of face (80-90%). So instead, Lloyd took the sheets to work and posted a message asking if anyone wanted to buy sheets of old U.S. stamps at face.
    • 2005 March 16, Cliff, “Re: This sounds like a newbie question....”, in rec.collecting.coins, Usenet[3]:
      Talking about buying below face, I've bought a lot of rolled coins at below face. I'm not going to pay face just to drag them to the bank and deposit them.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Hyponyms of face (noun)

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from face (noun)

Related termsEdit

Terms related to face

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: fjæs
  • Norwegian: fjes
  • Swedish: fjäs

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

face (third-person singular simple present faces, present participle facing, simple past and past participle faced)

  1. (transitive, of a person or animal) To position oneself or itself so as to have one's face closest to (something).
    Face the sun.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
  2. (transitive, of an object) To have its front closest to, or in the direction of (something else).
    Turn the chair so it faces the table.
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction.
  4. (transitive) To be presented or confronted with; to have in prospect.
    We are facing an uncertain future.
  5. (transitive) To deal with (a difficult situation or person); to accept (facts, reality, etc.) even when undesirable.
    I'm going to have to face this sooner or later.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar: Or, the Double Discovery. [], London: [] Richard Tonson and Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 6484883, (please specify the page number):
      I'll face / This tempest, and deserve the name of king.
    • 2013 June 7, Joseph Stiglitz, “Globalisation is about taxes too”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 19:
      It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. It is a tax system that is pivotal in creating the increasing inequality that marks most advanced countries today […].
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55:
      According to this saga of intellectual-property misanthropy, these creatures [patent trolls] roam the business world, buying up patents and then using them to demand extravagant payouts from companies they accuse of infringing them. Often, their victims pay up rather than face the costs of a legal battle.
    • 2020 August 26, “Network News: Mid-September before line reopens, says Network Rail”, in Rail, page 10:
      Network Rail doesn't expect the line through Carmont to open for around a month, as it faces the mammoth task of recovering the two power cars and four coaches from ScotRail's wrecked train, repairing bridge 325, stabilising earthworks around the landslip, and replacing the track.
  6. (intransitive) To have the front in a certain direction.
    The seats in the carriage faced backwards.
  7. (transitive) To have as an opponent.
    Real Madrid face Juventus in the quarter-finals.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, in BBC:
      And a further boost to England's qualification prospects came after the final whistle when Wales recorded a 2-1 home win over group rivals Montenegro, who Capello's men face in their final qualifier.
  8. (intransitive, cricket) To be the batsman on strike.
    Willoughby comes in to bowl, and it's Hobson facing.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To confront impudently; to bully.
  10. (transitive) To cover in front, for ornament, protection, etc.; to put a facing upon.
    a building faced with marble
  11. (transitive) To line near the edge, especially with a different material.
    to face the front of a coat, or the bottom of a dress
  12. To cover with better, or better appearing, material than the mass consists of, for purpose of deception, as the surface of a box of tea, a barrel of sugar, etc.
  13. (engineering) To make the surface of (anything) flat or smooth; to dress the face of (a stone, a casting, etc.); especially, in turning, to shape or smooth the flat surface of, as distinguished from the cylindrical surface.
  14. (transitive, retail) To arrange the products in (a store) so that they are tidy and attractive.
    In my first job, I learned how to operate a till and to face the store to high standards.

SynonymsEdit

  • (position oneself/itself towards):
  • (have its front closest to):
  • (deal with): confront, deal with

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Terms related to face (verb)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfarEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fʌˈħe/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

VerbEdit

facé

  1. (intransitive) boil
  2. (intransitive) ferment

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of face (type II verb)
1st singular 2nd singular 3rd singular 1st plural 2nd plural 3rd plural
m f
perfective V-affirmative facéh factéh facéh factéh facnéh facteeníh faceeníh
N-affirmative facé facté facé facté facné factén facén
negative máfacinniyo máfacinnito máfacinna máfacinna máfacinnino máfacinniton máfacinnon
imperfective V-affirmative facáh factáh facáh factáh facnáh factaanáh facaanáh
N-affirmative facá factá facá factá facná factán facán
negative máfaca máfacta máfaca máfacta máfacna máfactan máfacan
prospective V-affirmative facéliyoh
facéyyoh
facélitoh
facéttoh
facéleh facéleh facélinoh
facénnoh
facélitoonuh
facéttoonuh
facéloonuh
N-affirmative facéliyo
facéyyo
facélito
facétto
facéle facéle facélino
facénno
facéliton
facétton
facélon
conjunctive I V-affirmative fácuh fáctuh fácuh fáctuh fácuh factóonuh facóonuh
N-affirmative fácu fáctu fácu fáctu fácu factón facón
negative facé wáyuh facé wáytuh facé wáyuh facé wáytuh facé wáynuh facé waytóonuh facé wóonuh
conjunctive II V-affirmative facánkeh factánkeh facánkeh factánkeh facnánkeh factaanánkeh facaanánkeh
N-affirmative facánke factánke facánke factánke facnánke factaanánke facaanánke
negative facé wáankeh facé waytánkeh facé wáankeh facé waytánkeh facé waynánkeh facé waytaanánkeh facé wáankeh
jussive affirmative fácay fáctay fácay fáctay fácay factóonay facóonay
negative facé wáay facé wáytay facé wáay facé wáytay facé wáynay facé waytóonay facé wóonay
past
conditional
affirmative facinniyóy facinnitóy facinnáy facinnáy facinninóy facinnitóonuy facinnóonuy
negative facé wanniyóy facé wannitóy facé wannáy facé wannáy facé wanninóy facé wannitóonuy facé wanninóonuy
present
conditional I
affirmative facék facték facék facték facnék facteeník faceeník
negative facé wéek facé wayték facé wéek facé wayték facé waynék facé wayteeník facé weeník
singular plural singular plural
consultative affirmative facóo facnóo imperative affirmative fác fáca
negative mafacóo mafacnóo negative máfacin máfacina
-h converb -i form -k converb -in(n)uh converb -innuk converb infinitive indefinite participle
V-focus N-focus
fácah fáci fácak facínnuh facínnuk facíyya facináanih facináan
Compound tenses
past perfect affirmative perfective + perfective of én or sugé
present perfect affirmative perfective + imperfective of én
future perfect affirmative perfective + prospective of sugé
past progressive -k converb + imperfective of én or sugé
present progressive affirmative imperfect + imperfective of én
future progressive -k converb + prospective of sugé
immediate future affirmative conjunctive I + imperfective of wée
imperfect potential I affirmative conjunctive I + imperfective of takké
imperfect
potential II
affirmative imperfective + -m + takké
negative facé + imperfective of wée + -m + takké
perfect
potential
affirmative perfective + -m + takké
negative facé + perfective of wée + -m + takké
present
conditional II
affirmative imperfective + object pronoun + tekkék
negative facé + perfective of wée + object pronoun + tekkék
perfect
conditional
affirmative perfective + imperfective of sugé + -k
negative perfective + sugé + imperfective of wée -k
irrealis facé + perfective of xaaxé or raaré

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “face”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[4], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 280

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French and Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
  2. surface, side
  3. (geometry) face
  4. head (of a coin)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

NounEdit

face f (plural facis)

  1. face

InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

face

  1. present of facer
  2. imperative of facer

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -atʃe
  • Hyphenation: fà‧ce

Etymology 1Edit

Learned borrowing from Latin facem, accusative of fax (torch, firebrand).

NounEdit

face f (plural faci)

  1. (poetic) torch
    Synonyms: fiaccola, torcia
    • 1827, Ugo Foscolo, Le grazie[5], Felice Le Monnier, published 1848, page 42:
      [] vide [] ¶ Aiace [] ¶ Fra le dardanie faci arso e splendente ¶ Scagliar rotta la spada, e trarsi l'elmo, ¶ E fulminare immobile col guardo ¶ Ettore che perplesso ivi si tenne
      She saw Ajax, burning and shining among the Trojan torches, throw away the broken sword, and take off his helm, and, immobile, stare down Hector, who stood there perplexed.
  2. (poetic, transferred sense) light
    Synonyms: luce, lume, splendore
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • face in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

face

  1. Archaic form of fa, third-person singular present indicative of fare

LatinEdit

NounEdit

face

  1. ablative singular of fax

VerbEdit

face

  1. second-person singular present imperative active of faciō

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Classical Latin faciēs.

NounEdit

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • 14th C., Chaucer, General Prologue
      Boold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.
      Bold was her face, and fair, and red of hue.
SynonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: face (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: face
  • Yola: faace
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English fæs.

NounEdit

face

  1. Alternative form of fass

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

NounEdit

face f (oblique plural faces, nominative singular face, nominative plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Le chief li desarme et la face.
      He exposed his head and his face.
    • c. 1155, Wace, Le Roman de Brut:
      Li rois regarda li deus freres
      A cors bien fais, a faces cleres
      The king looked at the two brothers
      With their well-built bodies and clear faces
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 148 of this essay:
      Les signes subsequens est face enflée []
      the symptoms are the following: swollen face []

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
face

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese façe, faz, from Latin faciēs.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈfa.si/, [ˈfa.si]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈfa.sɨ/, [ˈfa.sɨ]

  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

NounEdit

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy, geometry) face
    Synonyms: cara, rosto
  2. (anatomy) the cheek
    Synonym: bochecha

ReferencesEdit

  • façe” in Dicionario de dicionarios do galego medieval.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō[1], from Proto-Italic *fakiō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set). The verb's original past participle was fapt, from factum, but was changed and replaced several centuries ago. An alternative third-person simple perfect, fece, from fecit, was also found in some dialects.[2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

a face (third-person singular present face, past participle făcut3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) do, make
  2. (reflexive) to be made, to be done

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈfaθe/, [ˈfa.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈfase/, [ˈfa.se]

VerbEdit

face

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of facer.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of facer.