EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fas

  1. plural of fa

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fas

  1. plural of fa

VerbEdit

fas

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of fer

GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

fas

  1. second-person singular present indicative of facer

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fas m pl

  1. plural of fa

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fas

  1. singular imperative of fasen

HlaiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Standard Hlai) IPA(key): /fa˩/

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Hlai *fʰaːʔ (sky), from Pre-Hlai *faːʔ (Norquest, 2015). Compare Proto-Tai *vaːᶜ (sky; weather) (whence Thai ฟ้า (fáa)).

NounEdit

fas

  1. sky

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Hlai *C-waːʔ (sour), from Pre-Hlai *C-waːʔ (Norquest, 2015).

AdjectiveEdit

fas

  1. sour

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fas n (genitive singular fass, no plural)

  1. deportment, manner

DeclensionEdit


IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfas]
  • Hyphenation: fas
  • Rhymes: -as

NounEdit

fas (first-person possessive fasku, second-person possessive fasmu, third-person possessive fasnya)

  1. Alternative spelling of vas (vase)

Jamaican CreoleEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fas

  1. Alternative spelling of fast.
    • 2005, Norman Grindley, “AUCTION - Impounded vehicles to go on sale”, in The Jamaica Star[1] (in English):
      “Mine in deh bout eight weeks now an' mi nuh have no money fi clear so mi mek up mi min' not fi clear it cause a $40,000 mi pay fi get it back di other day an' dem tek it now an' judge seh mi fi pay $30,000. Mi caan fin' dat amount of money so fas. []
      Mine has been there for about eight weeks and I don't have any money to pay the fine. So I decided not to pay it because I paid $40,000 to get it back the other day and they've taken it again. The judge said I have to pay $30,000. I can't find that kind of money so fast. []

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂os (utterance, saying), a derivative of the root *bʰeh₂- (to speak) whence also Latin for, fārī.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fās n sg (indeclinable, no genitive)

  1. (uncountable) dictates of religion, divine law (opp. iūs, human law), or an obligation thereunder
    hoc contra ius fasque est
    this is against law and divine law
    • (Can we date this quote?) Corpus Reformatorum[2], volume 38, page 235:
      Itaque si fas non est patris, vel filii, patrui vel nepotis uxorem habere in matrimonio, unum et idem de fratris uxore sentire convenit: de qua similis prorsus lex uno contextu et tenore perlata est.
      And so if divine law is that the father, or the son, the uncle or the nephew are not to have a wife in marriage, it comes together as one and the same thing about the brother's wife: from which a similar law is conveyed by means of connecting and grasping [a pattern].
  2. (uncountable) the will of God; a predetermined destiny
    • (Can we date this quote?) Aeneid I.206:
      illic fas regna resurgere Troiae.
      There it is divine will that the kingdom of Troy shall rise again.

DeclensionEdit

Not declined; used only in the nominative and accusative singular., singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative fās
Genitive
Dative
Accusative fās
Ablative
Vocative

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • fas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to trample all law under foot: ius ac fas omne delere
  • fas in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fas in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 203

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fas

  1. Alternative form of fass

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈfas/

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *vëstē.

AdverbEdit

fas

  1. again, once more
  2. on the other hand

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[4], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

fas

  1. imperative of fase

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fas n

  1. Alternative form of fæs

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

fas c

  1. a phase, a time period
  2. a phase (angular difference in periodic waves)
    i fas, ur fas
    in phase, out of phase
  3. a sloping edge

DeclensionEdit

Declension of fas 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fas fasen faser faserna
Genitive fas fasens fasers fasernas

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fas

  1. Soft mutation of bas.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bas fas mas unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

AdverbEdit

fas

  1. Soft mutation of mas.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mas fas unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

WolofEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic فَرَس(faras).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fas (definite form fas wi)

  1. horse