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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fiancé. The verb is from fiancer.

NounEdit

fiance (plural fiances)

  1. Alternative spelling of fiancé

VerbEdit

fiance (third-person singular simple present fiances, present participle fiancing, simple past and past participle fianced)

  1. (obsolete) To betroth; to affiance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Harmar to this entry?)
    • 1993 Cindy Holbrook, A Daring Deception, page 91
      he should become so lusty over a lady of such questionable motives? He was fianced, after all. Perhaps that was it. Since his engagement, he had abstained from any liaisons, feeling it was only proper in a man soon to be married

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French fiance, from Old French fiance, from fier +‎ -ance.

NounEdit

fiance f (plural fiances)

  1. (obsolete) faith; confidence

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

fiance

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fiancer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fiancer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fiancer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fiancer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fiancer

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French < fier +‎ -ance or Latin fidentia.

NounEdit

fiance f (plural fiances)

  1. faith; confidence

SynonymsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • fïance (occasional scholarly form)

EtymologyEdit

From the verb fier +‎ -ance or from Latin fidentia.

NounEdit

fiance f (oblique plural fiances, nominative singular fiance, nominative plural fiances)

  1. faith; confidence
    • circa 1150, Turoldus, La Chanson de Roland:
      En tels vassals deit hom aveir fiance !
      In such knights a man must have confidence!

SynonymsEdit