See also: FOI and fo'i

AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

foi

  1. third-person singular preterite indicative of ser

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French foy, from Old French foi, from earlier fei, inherited from Latin fidēs, fidem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- (to command, to persuade, to trust).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foi f (plural fois)

  1. faith
  2. (heraldry) a depiction of a handshake

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inflected form of ir (to go).

VerbEdit

foi

  1. third-person singular preterite indicative of ir

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of ser (to be).

VerbEdit

foi

  1. third-person singular preterite indicative of ser

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fidem, accusative singular of fidēs. Compare the 11Template:cup C. spelling feid where the link to fidem is clearer.

NounEdit

foi f (oblique plural fois, nominative singular foi, nominative plural fois)

  1. faith
  2. allegiance; faithfulness
    • c. 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 156 (of the Champion Classiques edition), →ISBN, line 1837:
      sa fei lealment li afie
      he loyally pledges his allegiance to him

DescendantsEdit

  • French: foi
  • Norman: fouai
  • Middle English: faith, fayth, feith, fayth

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

foi

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) preterite indicative of ir
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) preterite indicative of ser
    • 1999, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e o Prisioneiro de Azkaban, Rocco, page 57:
      O jantar aquela noite foi muito agradável.
      The dinner that night was very pleasant.

InterjectionEdit

foi

  1. indicates that an action has been undertaken; done
    — Pode enviar a mensagem? — Foi.
    “Can you send the message?”, “Done.”

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

foi

  1. plural of foaie

Etymology 2Edit

Either from foaie +‎ -i or from a Vulgar Latin root *follīre, from Late Latin follēre, present active infinitive of folleō, from Latin follis.

VerbEdit

a foi (third-person singular present foiește, past participle foit4th conj.

  1. (reflexive) to fuss, bustle, move about
  2. (of a place) to be full of people who are busy, teem with
    Synonym: mișuna
ConjugationEdit
See alsoEdit