Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch vrouwe ‎(lady), from Old Dutch *frōwa, from Proto-Germanic *frōwōn ‎(woman), from Proto-Indo-European *prōw- ‎(right; judge, master). Cognate with Dutch vrouw ‎(woman, wife, lady, mistress), Low German frouw, frauw ‎(woman, wife, lady), German Frau ‎(woman, wife, lady), Swedish fru, Icelandic freyja ‎(lady, mistress, in compounds), Old English frōwe ‎(woman), Old English frēa ‎(lord, master, husband).


frow ‎(plural frows)

  1. A woman; a wife, especially a Dutch or German one.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaumont and Fletcher to this entry?)
  2. A slovenly woman; a wench; a lusty woman.
  3. A big, fat woman; a slovenly, coarse, or untidy woman; a woman of low character.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit


frow ‎(plural frows)

  1. Alternative spelling of froe

Etymology 3Edit


frow ‎(comparative more frow, superlative most frow)

  1. (obsolete) brittle
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

Compare frower.


frow ‎(plural frows)

  1. A cleaving tool with handle at right angles to the blade, for splitting cask staves and shingles from the block; a frower.
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