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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wenche (girl; young maid), a shortened form of Middle English wenchel (girl; maiden; child), from Old English wenċel, winċel (child; servant; slave), from Proto-Germanic *wankilą, from Proto-Germanic *wankijaną (to sway; waver). Akin to Old High German wenken (to waver; yield; give way), Old High German wankōn (to totter).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wench (plural wenches)

  1. (archaic) A young woman, especially a servant.
    • W. Black
      He was received by the daughter of the house, a pretty, buxom, blue-eyed little wench.
  2. (archaic) A promiscuous woman.
    • Spectator
      It is not a digression to talk of bawds in a discourse upon wenches.
  3. (US, dated) A black woman; a negress.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wench (third-person singular simple present wenches, present participle wenching, simple past and past participle wenched)

  1. (intransitive) To frequent prostitutes; to womanize.
    • Roald Dahl, My Uncle Oswald
      Already, you see, I had begun to acquire a taste for rakery and wenching among the London debutantes.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wench (comparative wencher, superlative wenchest)

  1. (slang) attractive, good-looking