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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fud (countable and uncountable, plural fuds)

  1. Alternative form of fuddy-duddy
    • 1958, Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums:
      The other poets were either hornrimmed intellectual hepcats with wild black hair like Alvah Goldbook, or delicate pale handsome poets like Ike O'Shay (in a suit), or out-of-this-world genteel-looking Renaissance Italians like Francis DaPavia (who looks like a young priest), or bow-tied wild-haired old anarchist fuds like Rheinhold Cacoethes, or big fat bespectacled quiet booboos like Warren Coughlin.
    • 2006, P. Aarne Vesilind, The Right Thing to Do: An Ethics Guide for Engineering Students, →ISBN:
      The builders of steam engines and other machines alwo wanted to be known as professional engineers, but the old fuds in ASCE had a very narrow definition of engineering - if you did not build structures, then you could not be an engineer.
    • 2007, Christopher Brookmyre, Attack of the Unsinkable Rubber Ducks, →ISBN, page 104:
      Or as some baffled wannabe-trendy Oxbridge fud in the Telegraph put it, "acting like Mucous: it is big and it is clever.
  2. Alternative letter-case form of FUD

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish fut (dative of fat (length)) (compare modern fad).

NounEdit

fud

  1. (obsolete) dative singular of fad

Derived termsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Old Norse fuð and German Fotze.

NounEdit

fud (plural fuds)

  1. (vulgar) Cunt (vagina).
  2. (vulgar, slang, derogatory) Idiot.
    "Howey wi ye coupla fuds!"
  3. The tail of a hare or rabbit.
  4. The buttocks.

VerbEdit

fud

  1. to act like an idiot.

ReferencesEdit