See also: gęg and Geg

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin unknown. Perhaps from Old English *gǣgan (to go, walk, pass by), as in forgǣgan (to transgress, trespass, prevaricate, pass by, neglect, omit), ofergǣgan (to transgress), or from Old Norse geiga (to deviate to the side, go the wrong way, rove at random), both from Proto-Germanic *gaigijaną, *gīganą (to move), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeyǵʰ-, *gʰeygʰ- (to gape, protrude), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰēy(w)-, *ǵʰyāw- (to yawn, gape).

Cognate with Old Frisian gēia (to overstep, exceed), Norwegian dialectal geige (to sway back and forth), Middle High German gīgen (to play the violin), Old English gǣnan (to gape). More at jig.

VerbEdit

geg (third-person singular simple present gegs, present participle gegging, simple past and past participle gegged)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England) To walk carelessly or in a careless manner.
  2. (dialectal) To swing.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

NounEdit

geg

  1. Soft mutation of ceg.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ceg geg ngheg cheg
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.