genetic

See also: genètic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined from genesis[1], similarly to antithesis, antithetic.[2] Ultimately from Ancient Greek γίγνομαι (gígnomai, I come into being). Equivalent to gene +‎ -ic.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genetic (not comparable)

  1. (genetics) Relating to genetics or genes. [from 1908]
    • 2013 May-June, David Van Tassel, Lee DeHaan, “Wild Plants to the Rescue”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3:
      Plant breeding is always a numbers game. [] The wild species we use are rich in genetic variation, and individual plants are highly heterozygous and do not breed true. In addition, we are looking for rare alleles, so the more plants we try, the better.
  2. Caused by genes.
  3. Of or relating to origin (genesis). [from 1831]
    • 1858, Year-Book Of Facts In Science And Art For 1858
      All evidence tends to this conclusion, that the sun is the prime genetic agent of earthquakes and of every other pluto-dynamic impulse which acts against the crust of the planet, and breaks or elevates any of its parts.
  4. (linguistics) Based on shared membership in a linguistic family.
    Chinese has borrowed several words from English, but it does not have a genetic relationship to English.
  5. (theology) Based on a shared membership in a religious family.
    • 2016 September 15, Yamashiro, Koji, Yochai Ataria, David Gurevitz, Haviva Pedaya, Yuval Neria, editors, Trauma and Monotheism: Sugmund Freud’s Moses and Monotheism and the Possibility of Writing a Traumatic History of Religion[1], Springer International Publishing Switzerland, →ISBN, page 251:
      Guy Stroumsa (2011) proposes the use of the alternative term Abrahamic religions, emphasizing the genetic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and their branches, for which the idea of monotheism is not always central.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • genetic at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • genetic in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • "genetic" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 142.
  • genetic in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.
  1. ^ genetic” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  2. ^ genetic” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.

InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genetic (not comparable)

  1. genetic

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

genetic m (feminine singular genetica, masculine plural genetics, feminine plural geneticas)

  1. genetic

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French génétique.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genetic m or n (feminine singular genetică, masculine plural genetici, feminine and neuter plural genetice)

  1. genetic

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit