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See also: Geo, GEO, géo, geó, geo-, ge'o, Geo., and géo-

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Norn, from Old Norse gjá.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

geo (plural geos)

  1. (Shetland, Orkney, Caithness) An inlet, gully or cleft in the face of a cliff.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LimburgishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of geodriehook.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

geo m

  1. (mathematics, slang) set square
InflectionEdit
Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative geo geo's, geoër geëuke geëukes
Genitive geoos geo's, geoër geëukes geëukes
Locative geoës geoëser geoëske geoëskes
Dative¹²
Accusative¹²
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • The dative got out of use around 1900. As this is a recent invention, there is no conjugation for it to be found.

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of geografie.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

geo f

  1. geography
  2. (rare) geology
InflectionEdit
Inflection
Root singular Root plural³ Diminutive singular³ Diminutive plural³
Nominative geo geo's, geoër
Genitive geo geo's, geoër
Locative geoës geoëser
Dative¹²
Accusative¹²
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • The dative got out of use around 1900. As this is a recent invention, there is no conjugation for it to be found.
  • There is no diminutive.

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of geótj. Possibly from the verb ótte (to be squinting), but this is uncertain.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

geo (comparative geówer, superlative geóws, predicative superlative 't geóws)

  1. (obsolete) strange

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

geo

  1. (chiefly early) Alternative form of ye

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

geo m or f (plural geos)

  1. a member of the Grupo Especial de Operaciones