See also: Ego, égo, égő, and ego-

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego ‎(I). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich ‎(I).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ego ‎(plural egos)

  1. the self, especially with a sense of self-importance
    • 1998, Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth
      When every thought absorbs your attention completely, when you are so identified with the voice in your head and the emotions that accompany it that you lose yourself in every thought and every emotion, then you are totally identified with form and therefore in the grip of ego. Ego is a conglomeration of recurring thought forms and conditioned mental-emotional patterns that are invested with a sense of I, a sense of self.
  2. (psychology, Freudian) the most central part of the mind, which mediates with one's surroundings
    • 1954, Calvin S. Hall, “A Primer of Freudian Psychology”
      In the well adjusted person the ego is the executive of the personality and is governed by the reality principle.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego ‎(I).

NounEdit

ego n

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

NounEdit

ego n ‎(plural ego's, diminutive egootje n)

  1. ego, self

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin egō ‎(I).

NounEdit

ego

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ego (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative ego egot
genitive egon egojen
partitive egoa egoja
illative egoon egoihin
singular plural
nominative ego egot
accusative nom. ego egot
gen. egon
genitive egon egojen
partitive egoa egoja
inessive egossa egoissa
elative egosta egoista
illative egoon egoihin
adessive egolla egoilla
ablative egolta egoilta
allative egolle egoille
essive egona egoina
translative egoksi egoiksi
instructive egoin
abessive egotta egoitta
comitative egoineen

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

NounEdit

ego m ‎(invariable)

  1. ego

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ego or egō ‎(first person, nominative, plural nos)

  1. I; first person singular personal pronoun, nominative case
    • Heauton Timorumenos (“The Self-Tormentor”) by Publius Terentius Afer
      Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto.
      I am a man, I consider nothing that is human alien to me.
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 3:19
      et aut ego indigna fui illis aut illi mihi forsitan digni non fuerunt quia forsitan viro alio conservasti me (And either I was unworthy of them, or they perhaps were not worthy of me: because perhaps thou hast kept me for another man,)

InflectionEdit

Personal pronoun declension.

Singular First-person Second-person Reflexive
nominative egō
genitive meī tuī suī
dative mihi tibi sibi
accusative , sēsē
ablative , sēsē
vocative egō
possessive meus tuus suus
Plural First-person Second-person Reflexive
nominative nōs vōs
genitive nostrī, nostrum vestrī, vestrum suī
dative nōbīs vōbīs sibi
accusative nōs vōs , sēsē
ablative nōbīs vōbīs , sēsē
vocative nōs vōs
possessive noster vester, voster suus

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ego in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ego in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • EGO” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • ego” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: vix me contineo quin lacrimem
    • I cannot sleep for anxiety: curae somnum mihi adimunt, dormire me non sinunt
    • I'm undone! it's all up with me: perii! actum est de me! (Ter. Ad. 3. 2. 26)
    • I was induced by several considerations to..: multae causae me impulerunt ad aliquid or ut...
    • I console myself with..: hoc (illo) solacio me consōlor
    • I console myself with..: haec (illa) res me consolatur
    • (great) advantage accrues to me from this: fructus ex hac re redundant in or ad me
    • I will refuse you nothing: nihil tibi a me postulanti recusabo
    • I express my approval of a thing: res a me probatur
    • as far as I can guess: quantum ego coniectura assequor, auguror
    • if I am not mistaken: nisi (animus) me fallit
    • unless I'm greatly mistaken: nisi omnia me fallunt
    • I am not unaware: me non fugit, praeterit
    • I cannot bring myself to..: a me impetrare non possum, ut
    • I forget something: oblivio alicuius rei me capit
    • experience has taught me: usus me docuit
    • this goes to prove what I say: hoc est a (pro) me
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • something harasses me, makes me anxious: aliquid me sollicitat, me sollicitum habet, mihi sollicitudini est, mihi sollicitudinem affert
    • I am discontented with my lot: fortunae meae me paenitet
    • I am not dissatisfied with my progress: non me paenitet, quantum profecerim
    • what will become of me: quid (de) me fiet? (Ter. Heaut. 4. 3. 37)
    • it's all over with me; I'm a lost man: actum est de me
    • I have great hopes that..: magna me spes tenet (with Acc. c. Inf.) (Tusc. 1. 41. 97)
    • hope has played me false: spes me frustratur
    • I have received a legacy from a person: hereditas ad me or mihi venit ab aliquo (Verr. 2. 1. 10)
    • I have no objection: per me licet
    • (ambiguous) to be burned to ashes: incendio deleri, absūmi
    • (ambiguous) to be carried off by a disease: morbo absūmi (Sall. Iug. 5. 6)
    • (ambiguous) to die a natural death: morbo perire, absūmi, consūmi
    • (ambiguous) according to my strong conviction: ex animi mei sententia (vid. sect. XI. 2)
    • (ambiguous) I put myself at your disposal as regards advice: consilii mei copiam facio tibi
    • (ambiguous) my dear father: pater optime or carissime, mi pater (vid. sect. XII. 10)
    • (ambiguous) I swear on my conscience: ex animi mei sententia iuro

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

ego m (invariable)

  1. ego

NounEdit

ego m (invariable)

  1. eglantine

SynonymsEdit

  1. smaržlapu roze

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego ‎(I).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego (the self)
  2. (psychology) ego (most central part of the mind)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /êːɡo/
  • Hyphenation: e‧go

NounEdit

ȇgo m ‎(Cyrillic spelling е̑го)

  1. ego

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego ‎(I).

NounEdit

ego m ‎(plural egos)

  1. ego

Related termsEdit

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