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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *gloten, glouten, from Old Norse glotta (to grin, smile scornfully) or Old English *glotian, both from Proto-Germanic *glutōną (to stare), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shine), related to Swedish dialectal glotta, glutta (to peep), Middle High German glutzen, glotzen (to stare), Modern German glotzen (to gawk, goggle)[1].

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gloat (third-person singular simple present gloats, present participle gloating, simple past and past participle gloated)

  1. To exhibit a conspicuous (sometimes malevolent) pleasure or sense of self-satisfaction, often at an adversary's misfortune.
  2. To triumph, crow, relish, glory, revel.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

gloat (plural gloats)

  1. An act or instance of gloating.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ gloat” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit