See also: Guano, guanó, and guáno

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish guano, from Quechua wanu.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡwɑːnəʊ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːnəʊ

NounEdit

guano (countable and uncountable, plural guanos or guanoes)

  1. Dung from a sea bird or from a bat.
    • 1799, Edwin Sidney, Blights of the Wheat, and Their Remedies, page 175:
      The guano, so extensively used for manure, is full of the most beautiful infusoria, some of them splendidly iridiscent; and there is no better method of testing the genuineness of this useful substance than by the microscope.
    • 1844, J. Ridgway, Peruvian and Bolivian Guano, its nature, properties and results, page 22:
      In the second experiment, a comparative trial was made between guano and bone-dust mixed with coal ashes.
    • 1918, Philip Lindsey Gile, The bat guanos of Porto Rico and their fertilizing value, page 60:
      Low-grade phosphatic guanos can be mixed with coffee hulls and pulp, which contain a small amount of potash.
    • 1995, Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls:
      The great white bat has great white guano!
    Hyponyms: birdshit (vulgar), batshit (vulgar)
  2. (obsolete) A variety of seabird.
    • 1703, William Dampier, A New Voyage round the World, volume 1:
      The Animals of these Islands, are some Hogs, Lizards, and Guanoes; and some of those Creatures mentioned in Chap. XI. which are like, but much bigger than the Guano.
    • 1764, Lives of illustrious British seamen, etc, page 111:
      Dampier observes, that no part of the globe is so well stocked with guanoes and land-tortoises as the Gallapagos. The guanoes are fat, tame, and of an extraordinary size.
    • 1765, John Barrow, A Collection Of Authentic, Useful, and Entertaining Voyages and Discoveries:
      These they call Guanoes, and the dung Guano, the Indian name for excrement in general. These birds, after spending the whole day in catching their food in the sea, repair at night to rest on the islands near the coast []
    • 1850, Annual Report of the American Institute, on the Subject of Agriculture, American Institute in the City of New York:
      The fish consumed by the guanoes, (as the fishing birds are called) are anchovies, the shoals of which are beyond all comparison.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

guano

  1. guano

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of guano (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative guano guanot
genitive guanon guanojen
partitive guanoa guanoja
illative guanoon guanoihin
singular plural
nominative guano guanot
accusative nom. guano guanot
gen. guanon
genitive guanon guanojen
partitive guanoa guanoja
inessive guanossa guanoissa
elative guanosta guanoista
illative guanoon guanoihin
adessive guanolla guanoilla
ablative guanolta guanoilta
allative guanolle guanoille
essive guanona guanoina
translative guanoksi guanoiksi
instructive guanoin
abessive guanotta guanoitta
comitative guanoineen
Possessive forms of guano (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person guanoni guanomme
2nd person guanosi guanonne
3rd person guanonsa

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

guano m (plural guani)

  1. guano

PortugueseEdit

 
Mineração de guano

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish guano, from a Quechuan language wanu (dung).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

guano m (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) guano (bat or sea bird feces)
  2. fertilizer made from such feces

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Quechua wanu (dung).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

guano m (plural guanos)

  1. guano