Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dung, dunge, donge, from Old English dung (dung; excrement; manure), from Proto-Germanic *dungō (dung), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover).

NounEdit

dung (countable and uncountable, plural dungs)

  1. (uncountable) Manure; animal excrement.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, act III, scene iv, line 129
      Poor Tom, that eats the swimming frog, the toad, the todpole, the wall-newt, and the water; that in the fury of his heart, when the foul fiend rages, eats cow-dung for sallets; swallows the old rat and the ditch-dog; drinks the green mantle of the standing pool []
    • 1611, Authorized King James Version, Malachi 2:3
      Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces, even the dung of your solemn feasts; and one shall take you away with it.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 4, page 496
      The labourer at the dung cart is paid at 3d. or 4d. a day; and on one estate, Lullington, scattering dung is paid a 5d. the hundred heaps.
  2. (countable) A type of manure, as from a particular species or type of animal.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dung (third-person singular simple present dungs, present participle dunging, simple past and past participle dunged)

  1. (transitive) To fertilize with dung.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Dryden to this entry?)
    • 1993, Henry Leach, Endure No Makeshifts: Some Naval Recollections
      She had been dunging the roses and was fairly covered in muck.
  2. (transitive, calico printing) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot water containing cow dung, done to remove the superfluous mordant.
  3. (intransitive) To void excrement.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See ding

VerbEdit

dung

  1. (obsolete) past participle of ding

Etymology 3Edit

unknown

VerbEdit

dung (third-person singular simple present dungs, present participle dunging, simple past and past participle dunged)

  1. (colloquial) To discard (especially rubbish); to chuck out.

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *dungz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover; covering)

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dung f

  1. dungeon, prison
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *dungō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dung f

  1. dung, manure
DeclensionEdit

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *dungiz, *dungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover).

NounEdit

dung m, f

  1. weaving, weavingroom

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dung

  1. (archaic or literary) to tolerate
    trời không dung, đất không tha
    the sky doesn't tolerate it, the earth doesn't forgive it

Derived termsEdit