honorificabilitudinitatibus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Dative and ablative plural of Medieval Latin honōrificābilitūdinitās, from Latin honōrificāre (to honor) + -bilitās (-ability) (with a redundant -tūdō (-itude) infixed).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɒn.əˌɹɪf.ɪ.kəˌbɪl.ɪˌt(j)uː.dɪ.nɪˈteɪ.tɪ.bəs/, /-ˈtæt.ɪ.bəs/
  • Hyphenation: hon‧or‧if‧ic‧a‧bil‧i‧tu‧din‧it‧a‧ti‧bus

NounEdit

honorificabilitudinitatibus (uncountable)

  1. the state of being able to achieve honors
  2. (figuratively) a sesquipedalian word; verbal prolixity
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost:
      O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words. I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon.
    • 1599, Thomas Nashe, Lenten Stuffe:
      Physitions deafen our eares with the Honorificabilitudinitatibus of their heauenly Panachea, their soueraine Ginacum.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      Like John o'Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear as the coat and crest he toadied for, on a bend of sable a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus, dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene in the country.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ho.no.ri.fi.ka.bi.li.tu.di.niˈta.ti.bus/, [hɔ.nɔ.rɪ.fɪ.ka.bɪ.lʲɪ.t̪ʊ.d̪ɪ.nɪˈt̪a.t̪ɪ.bʊs]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /o.no.ri.fi.ka.bi.li.tu.di.niˈta.ti.bus/, [ɔ.nɔ.ri.fi.ka.bi.li.t̪u.d̪i.niˈt̪aː.t̪i.bus]

NounEdit

honōrificābilitūdinitātibus

  1. dative plural of honōrificābilitūdinitās
  2. ablative plural of honōrificābilitūdinitās