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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From hūmānus (human) +‎ -tās.

NounEdit

hūmānitās f (genitive hūmānitātis); third declension

  1. humanity, human nature
  2. kindness, courtesy
  3. culture, civilization

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative hūmānitās hūmānitātēs
Genitive hūmānitātis hūmānitātum
Dative hūmānitātī hūmānitātibus
Accusative hūmānitātem hūmānitātēs
Ablative hūmānitāte hūmānitātibus
Vocative hūmānitās hūmānitātēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • humanitas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • humanitas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • humanitas in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • humanitas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be quite uncivilised: omnis cultus et humanitatis expertem esse
    • to be quite uncivilised: ab omni cultu et humanitate longe abesse (B. G. 1. 1. 3)
    • to teach a person refinement: aliquem ad humanitatem informare or instituere
    • the usual subjects taught to boys: artes, quibus aetas puerilis ad humanitatem informari solet
    • to be quite insensible to all feelings of humanity: omnem humanitatem exuisse, abiecisse (Lig. 5. 14)
    • to be quite insensible of all feelings to humanity: omnem humanitatis sensum amisisse
    • to be absolutely wanting in sympathy: omnis humanitatis expertem esse
    • to stifle, repress all humane sentiments in one's mind: omnem humanitatem ex animo exstirpare (Amic. 13. 48)
    • a most courteous letter: litterae officii or humanitatis plenae
  • humanitas in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016