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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Danish hygge or Norwegian hygge.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhʊɡə/, /ˈhuːɡə/

NounEdit

hygge (uncountable)

  1. (chiefly Britain) Cosiness, conviviality. [from 21st c.]
    • 2016, Charlotte Higgins, The Guardian, 22 November:
      According to this now vast popular literature, the creation of an atmosphere of hygge is aided by gløgg (mulled wine), meatballs and cardamom buns.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hygge

  1. (chiefly Britain) Cosy, convivial. [from 21st c.]
    • 2015, Helen Russell, The Year of Living Danishly:
      ‘So, where are they all? What's everyone doing?’
      ‘They're getting hygge,’ she tells me, making a noise that sounds a little like she has something stuck in her throat.

Usage notesEdit

  • Used in Danish or Norwegian contexts.

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish hyggæ, from Old Norse hyggja (to think), from Proto-Germanic *hugjaną (to think, reconsider).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hygge c (singular definite hyggen, not used in plural form)

  1. cosiness

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

hygge

  1. (reflexive, intransitive) have a good time, enjoy oneself

ReferencesEdit