Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin incusus, past participle of incudere, from in- + cudere.

AdjectiveEdit

incuse (not comparable)

  1. hammered or pressed in (usually on a coin)
    The back of the coin bears an incuse coat of arms.

NounEdit

incuse (plural incuses)

  1. an impression hammered or pressed (onto a coin)
    This coin's incuse is of a most curious design.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

incuse (third-person singular simple present incuses, present participle incusing, simple past and past participle incused)

  1. (transitive) To hammer or press (usually onto a coin)
    There is a long tradition of monarchs having their own figure incused in their kingdom's coins.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit