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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English indignation, borrowed from Old French indignation, from Latin indignātiō, from indignor (to scorn, resent), from indignus (unworthy, not fitting), from in- (not) + dignus (worthy, appropriate). Attested since ca. 1374.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪn.dɪɡ.ˈneɪ.ʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

NounEdit

indignation (countable and uncountable, plural indignations)

  1. An anger aroused by something perceived as an indignity, notably an offense or injustice.
  2. A self-righteous anger or disgust.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin indignātiō, indignātiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

indignation f (plural indignations)

  1. Indignation

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit