See also: Harm

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English harm, herm, from Old English hearm, from Proto-West Germanic *harm, from Proto-Germanic *harmaz (harm; shame; pain). Cognate with Dutch harm (harm), German Harm (harm), Swedish harm (anger, indignation, harm), Icelandic harmur (sorrow, grief).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

harm (countable and uncountable, plural harms)

  1. Physical injury; hurt; damage.
    No harm came to my possessions.
    You can do a lot of harm to someone if you kick them in the balls. Especially if they get revenge and bring out a bazooka and blast your head off.
  2. Emotional or figurative hurt.
    Although not physically injured in the car accident, she received some psychological harm.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XIII, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them. Soft heartedness caused more harm than good.
  3. Detriment; misfortune.
    I wish him no harm.
  4. That which causes injury, damage, or loss.

Usage notes edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

harm (third-person singular simple present harms, present participle harming, simple past and past participle harmed)

  1. To cause injury to another; to hurt; to cause damage to something.
    • 2020 December 16, Yan Ming, “Awakening Moral Conscience”, in Minghui[1]:
      Will justice and conscience of society not be harmed if people avoid the truth?

Translations edit

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from the noun or verb harm
Expressions derived from the noun or verb harm

Anagrams edit

Icelandic edit

Noun edit

harm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of harmur

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

harm

  1. h-prothesized form of arm

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English hearm, from Proto-West Germanic *harm.

Noun edit

harm (plural harms)

  1. harm, injury, ruination

Descendants edit

  • English: harm
  • Scots: herm, hairm
  • Yola: harrm

References edit

Old Norse edit

Noun edit

harm

  1. accusative singular of harmr

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *harmaz.

Noun edit

harm m

  1. harm

Descendants edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish harmber, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *harmaz. Cognate with English harm.

Noun edit

harm c

  1. angry indignation (at something considered unjust)
  2. (archaic) (physical or emotional) harm

Declension edit

Declension of harm 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative harm harmen
Genitive harms harmens

References edit