Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

induce +‎ -ment

NounEdit

inducement (countable and uncountable, plural inducements)

  1. An incentive that helps bring about a desired state. In some contexts, this can imply bribery.[1]
    Citation of Richard Stallman ...it won't run on a free platform and (...) your program is actually an inducement for people to install non-free software.[2]
  2. (law) An introductory statement of facts or background information.
  3. (shipping) The act of placing a port on a vessel's itinerary because the volume of cargo offered at that port justifies the cost of routing the vessel.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/sa/consol_act/clca1935262/s249.html
  2. ^ Richard Stallman's speech in Australian National University on 13 October 2004, Part 2, as seen in this film on video.google.com, circa 40% into the movie. Stallman was talking about Java and flash as inducements for installing non-free software.[dead link]