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See also: Cargo and cargó

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish cargo (load, burden), from cargar (to load), from Late Latin carricare.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo (countable and uncountable, plural cargos or cargoes)

  1. Freight carried by a ship, aircraft, or motor vehicle.
    • 1806, James Harrison, The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson
      "…her whole and entire cargo; and, also, all such other cargoes and property as may have been landed in the island of Teneriffe,…"
    • 1913, Nephi Anderson, Story of Chester Lawrence,
      "…but human life is worth more than ships or cargos."
  2. (Papua New Guinea) Western material goods.
    • 1995, Martha Kaplan, Neither Cargo Nor Cult: Ritual Politics and the Colonial Imagination in Fiji, Duke University Press, page xi
      "They wrote of Pacific people with millenarian (and sometimes anti-colonial) expectations who used magical means to get western things (hence the term "cargo" cult)."

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English cargo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos)

  1. ship designed to carry a cargo

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural carghi)

  1. cargo boat
  2. freighter (boat or plane)

PortugueseEdit

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (genitive singular cargo, plural cargothan)

  1. Alternative form of carago.

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos)

  1. charge, burden
  2. position, post
  3. (finance) debit
  4. (heraldry) charge

cargo m (plural cargos, feminine carga, feminine plural cargas)

  1. higher-up

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

cargo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of cargar.

VenetianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cargo m (feminine singular carga, masculine plural cargi, feminine plural carge)

  1. loaded, laden
  2. charged
  3. full