See also: Cargo and cargó

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish cargo (load, burden), from cargar (to load), from Late Latin carricō. Doublet of charge.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo (countable and uncountable, plural cargos or cargoes)

  1. Freight carried by a ship, aircraft, or motor vehicle.
    • 1806, James Harrison, The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson:
      " [] her whole and entire cargo; and, also, all such other cargoes and property as may have been landed in the island of Teneriffe, [] "
    • 1913, Nephi Anderson, Story of Chester Lawrence:
      " [] but human life is worth more than ships or cargos."
    • 2005, J. M. Coetzee, “Five”, in Slow Man, New York: Viking, →ISBN, page 34:
      How will heaven be filled if the earth ceases to send its cargoes?
  2. (Papua New Guinea) Western material goods.
    • 1964, Peter Lawrence, Road Belong Cargo:
      The principal change was that two of the 'satans', Kilibob and Manup, were now identified by different groups as God and Jesus Christ, as cargo deities. This expressed the return to hostility towards Europeans and a reassessment of native rights to the cargo.
    • 1995, Martha Kaplan, Neither Cargo Nor Cult:
      In this study of colonial and postcolonial Fiji, Martha Kaplan examines the effects of narratives made real and traces a complex history that began neither as a search for cargo, nor as a cult.
    • 1998, Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, page 22:
      Why is it that Europeans, despite their likely genetic disadvantage and (in modern times) their undoubted developmental disadvantage, ended up with much more of the cargo
    • 2002, Dorothy K. Billings, Cargo Cult as Theater: Political Performance in the Pacific, page 60:
      He was the only one to tell me that he thought it was possible that cargo was made by the ancestors. One or two others were noncommittal, but most clearly denied it.
    • 2004, Lamont Lindstrom, “Cargo Cult at the Third Millennium”, in Holger Jebens, editor, Cargo, Cult, and Culture Critique:
      People turned to traditional or innovative religious ritual to obtain "cargo."
    • 2019, Lamont Lindstrom ·, Cargo Cult: Strange Stories of Desire from Melanesia and Beyond, page 5:
      And beyond antrhopologists and Islanders, others have been enchanted by cargo as well.

Derived termsEdit


TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English cargo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos)

  1. ship designed to carry a cargo

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural carghi)

  1. cargo boat
  2. freighter (boat or plane)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos)

  1. post, occupation, profession
  2. office; responsibility

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (genitive singular cargo, plural cargothan)

  1. Alternative form of carago.

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaɾɡo/, [ˈkaɾ.ɣ̞o]
  • Hyphenation: car‧go

Etymology 1Edit

Deverbal of cargar.

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos)

  1. charge, burden
  2. position, post
  3. (finance) debit
  4. (heraldry) charge
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

cargo m (plural cargos, feminine carga, feminine plural cargas)

  1. higher-up

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

cargo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of cargar.

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cargo m (feminine singular carga, masculine plural cargi, feminine plural carge)

  1. loaded, laden
  2. charged
  3. full