See also: incentivé

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin incentivus(that strikes up or sets the tune), from incinere(to strike up), from in(in, on) + canere(to sing). The formation appears to have been influenced by incendere ' to set on fire'.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

incentive ‎(plural incentives)

  1. Something that motivates, rouses, or encourages.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: perhaps out of a desire to escape the gravity of this world or to get a preview of the next; […].
    I have no incentive to do housework right now.
  2. A bonus or reward, often monetary, to work harder.
    Management offered the sales team a $500 incentive for each car sold.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incentive ‎(comparative more incentive, superlative most incentive)

  1. Inciting; encouraging or moving; rousing to action; stimulating.
    • Dr. H. More
      Competency is the most incentive to industry.
  2. Serving to kindle or set on fire.
    • Milton
      Part incentive reed / Provide, pernicious with one touch of fire.

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incentīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of incentīvus

PortugueseEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

incentive

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of incentivar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of incentivar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of incentivar.