English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
The old port of Dubrovnik

From Old English port, borrowed from Latin portus (port, harbour), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing) (and thus a distant doublet of ford). The directional sense, attested since at least the 1500s, derives from ancient vessels with the steering oar on the right (see etymology of starboard), which therefore had to moor with their left sides facing the dock or wharf.

Noun edit

port (countable and uncountable, plural ports)

  1. A place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.
    Synonyms: harbour, haven
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene i]:
      peering in maps for ports and piers and roads
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo's port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
  2. A town or city containing such a place, a port city.
    Synonyms: harbour city, harbour town, port city
    • 2023 July 1, Mark Townsend, “‘We are seen as less human’: inside Marseille’s districts abandoned by the police”, in The Observer[1], →ISSN:
      More broadly, the port is seen as a litmus test for France; if its most multicultural city can foster vast Muslim enclaves viewed with broad suspicion or hostility by the police, then what hope is there elsewhere?
  3. (nautical, aviation, uncountable) The left-hand side of a vessel, including aircraft, when one is facing the front. Used to unambiguously refer to directions relative to the vessel structure, rather than to a person or object on board.
    Synonyms: backboard, larboard, leeboard, left
    Antonym: starboard
  4. (rowing) A sweep rower that primarily rows with an oar on the port side.
    Each eight has four ports and four starboards.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Hindi: पोर्ट (porṭ)
  • Russian: порт (port)
  • Thai: พอร์ต (pɔ̂ɔt)
Translations edit

Adjective edit

port (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) Of or relating to port, the left-hand side of a vessel when facing the bow.
    on the port side
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

port (third-person singular simple present ports, present participle porting, simple past and past participle ported)

  1. (nautical, transitive, chiefly imperative) To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; said of the helm.
    Port your helm!
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from the Old English port, from the Latin porta (passage, gate), reinforced by the Old French porte. Doublet of porta.

Noun edit

port (plural ports)

  1. (now Scotland, historical) An entryway or gate.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      And whan he cam to the porte of the pavelon, Sir Palomydes seyde an hyghe, ‘Where art thou, Sir Trystram de Lyones?’
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      Long were it to describe the goodly frame, / And stately port of Castle Joyeous [] .
    • 1623, Shakespeare, Coriolanus, V.vi:
      Him I accuse / The city ports by this hath enter'd
    • 1667, Milton, Paradise Lost, book IV:
      And from their ivory port the Cherubim, / Forth issuing at the accustomed hour
  2. An opening or doorway in the side of a ship, especially for boarding or loading; an embrasure through which a cannon may be discharged; a porthole.
    • c. 1615, Sir W. Raleigh, A Discourse of the Invention of Ships, Anchors, Compass [] :
      [] her ports being within sixteen inches of the water []
  3. (medicine) A small medical appliance installed beneath the skin, connected to a vein by a catheter, and used to inject drugs or to draw blood samples.
  4. (curling, bowls) A space between two stones wide enough for a delivered stone or bowl to pass through.
  5. An opening where a connection (such as a pipe) is made.
  6. (computing):
    1. A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred.   Computer port on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
    2. A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.
    3. (also networking) A number that delimits a connection for specific processes or parts of a network service.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old French porter, from Latin portāre (carry). Akin to transport, portable.

Verb edit

port (third-person singular simple present ports, present participle porting, simple past and past participle ported)

  1. To carry, bear, or transport. See porter.
    • 1662, Fuller, The History of the Worthies of England:
      They are easily ported by boat into other shires.
  2. (military) To hold or carry (a weapon) with both hands so that it lays diagonally across the front of the body, with the barrel or similar part near the left shoulder and the right hand grasping the small of the stock; or, to throw (the weapon) into this position on command.
    Port arms!
  3. (computing, video games) To adapt, modify, or create a new version of, a program so that it works on a different platform.   Porting (computing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  4. (telephony, transitive) To carry or transfer (an existing telephone number) from one telephone service provider to another.
    • 2011, Stephen P. Olejniczak, Telecom For Dummies, page 131:
      If you submit a request to port a number, and you list the name on the account as Bob Smith, but your local carrier has the number listed under your wife's name Mary Mahoney, the porting request is rejected.
  5. (US, government and law) To transfer a voucher or subsidy from one jurisdiction to another.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

port (plural ports)

  1. Something used to carry a thing, especially a frame for wicks in candle-making.
  2. (archaic) The manner in which a person carries himself; bearing; deportment; carriage. See also portance.
    • late 14th c., Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in Canterbury Tales, line 69:
      And of his port as meeke as is a mayde.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iii:
      Those same with stately grace, and princely port / She taught to tread, when she her selfe would grace []
    • a. 1717 (date written), Robert South, “(please specify the sermon number)”, in Five Additional Volumes of Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions. [], volumes (please specify |volume=VII to XI), London: [] Charles Bathurst, [], published 1744, →OCLC:
      the necessities of pomp, grandeur, and a suitable port in the world
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Grove Press, published 1959, →OCLC:
      For the port, the voice, the smell, the hairdress, were seldom the same, from one day to the next, []
  3. (military) The position of a weapon when ported; a rifle position executed by throwing the weapon diagonally across the front of the body, with the right hand grasping the small of the stock and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
  4. (computing) A program that has been adapted, modified, or recoded so that it works on a different platform from the one for which it was created; the act of this adapting.
    Gamers can't wait until a port of the title is released on the new system.
    The latest port of the database software is the worst since we made the changeover.
  5. (computing, BSD) A set of files used to build and install a binary executable file from the source code of an application.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

Named from Portuguese Porto, a city in Portugal where the wines were originally shipped from.

Noun edit

port (countable and uncountable, plural ports)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. A type of very sweet fortified wine, mostly dark red, traditionally made in Portugal.
Synonyms edit
Coordinate terms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 5 edit

Abbreviation of portmanteau.

Noun edit

port (plural ports)

  1. (Queensland) A suitcase or schoolbag.
    • 1964, George Johnston, My Brother Jack:
      No, she just paid up proper-like t' the end of the week, an' orf she went with 'er port, down t' the station, I suppose.
    • 2001, Sally de Dear, The House on Pig Island[2], page 8:
      As they left the classroom, Jennifer pointed at the shelves lining the veranda. “Put your port in there.”
      “What?” asked Penny.
      “Your port - your school bag, silly. It goes in there.”
    • 2006, Alexis Wright, Carpentaria, Giramondo, published 2012, page 53:
      How do you think the cane toads got into this pristine environment? Joseph Midnight brought them in his port from Townsville, smuggled them in, not that anyone was there to stop him.

Etymology 6 edit

Abbreviation of portfolio.

Noun edit

port (plural ports)

  1. (informal) The portfolio of a model or artist.
    • 2011, Debbie Rose Myers, The Graphic Designer's Guide to Portfolio Design, page 53:
      This is a logical way to order your work, but use it only if you're confident the first piece in your port is a strong one. Also note that this style of arrangement works best if all the pieces are in the same category.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Noun edit

port m (plural porte, definite porti, definite plural portet)

  1. port, harbor

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Catalan port, from Latin portus, from Proto-Italic *portus, from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing), from *per- (to go forth, to cross).

Noun edit

port m (plural ports)

  1. port, harbour
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From portar.

Noun edit

port m (plural ports)

  1. (rare or archaic) the action of carrying something from one place to another
  2. (rare) the volume a boat or another vehicle can carry

References edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of English report.

Pronunciation edit


Verb edit

port

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, transitive, informal) to file a complaint against; to report

Synonyms edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse portr m, port n, borrowed via Old English port m (gate) from Latin porta. Compare also German Pforte.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoːˀrt/, [ˈpʰoɐ̯ˀd̥]

Noun edit

port c (singular definite porten, plural indefinite porte)

  1. gate
  2. gateway

Declension edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French port.

Noun edit

port m or n (plural porten)

  1. postage
Alternative forms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English port, from port wine. Named for Portuguese Porto, a city in Portugal where the wines were originally shipped from.

Noun edit

port m (uncountable, diminutive portje n)

  1. (a glass of) port, port wine, Porto

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

port

  1. inflection of porren:
    1. second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. (archaic) plural imperative

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French port, borrowed from Latin portus, from Proto-Italic *portus, from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing), from *per- (to go forth, to cross).

Noun edit

port m (plural ports)

  1. port, harbour
  2. port, harbour city
  3. refuge
  4. transport
  5. postage
  6. stature, way of carrying oneself
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Deverbal of porter. Ultimately from the same source as etymology 1 above.

Noun edit

port m (plural ports)

  1. wearing (act of wearing something)

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

port (plural portok)

  1. (computing) port
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative port portok
accusative portot portokat
dative portnak portoknak
instrumental porttal portokkal
causal-final portért portokért
translative porttá portokká
terminative portig portokig
essive-formal portként portokként
essive-modal
inessive portban portokban
superessive porton portokon
adessive portnál portoknál
illative portba portokba
sublative portra portokra
allative porthoz portokhoz
elative portból portokból
delative portról portokról
ablative porttól portoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
porté portoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
portéi portokéi
Possessive forms of port
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. portom portjaim
2nd person sing. portod portjaid
3rd person sing. portja portjai
1st person plural portunk portjaink
2nd person plural portotok portjaitok
3rd person plural portjuk portjaik

Etymology 2 edit

por +‎ -t

Noun edit

port

  1. accusative singular of por

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin porta.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port n (genitive singular ports, nominative plural port)

  1. gate, gateway, entryway

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

port m (genitive singular poirt, nominative plural poirt)

  1. (music) tune
    Is buaine port ná glór na n-éan; is buaine focal ná toice an tsaoil. (proverb)
    A tune is more lasting than the song of birds; a word is more lasting than the wealth of the world.
  2. jig (dance)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish port (bank, shore),[1] borrowed from Latin portus (harbour).

Noun edit

port m (genitive singular poirt, nominative plural poirt)

  1. landing-place
  2. harbor, port
  3. bank (of river, etc.)
  4. mound, embankment
  5. refuge, haven, resort
  6. stopping-place
  7. place, locality
  8. fortified place, stronghold
  9. occupied place, seat, centre
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
port phort bport
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 port”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading edit

Ladin edit

Etymology edit

From Latin portus.

Noun edit

port m (plural porc)

  1. port, harbour

Maltese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Sicilian portu, from Latin portus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port m (plural portijiet)

  1. harbour, port
    Synonym: (archaic) marsa

Masurian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish port.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɔrt]
  • Syllabification: port

Noun edit

port m inan

  1. port (a place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers)

Further reading edit

  • Zofia Stamirowska (1987-2021), “port”, in Anna Basara, editor, Słownik gwar Ostródzkiego, Warmii i Mazur, volume 6, Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo Polskiej Akademii Nauk, →ISBN, page 255

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French port, borrowed from Latin portus (port, harbour).

Noun edit

port m (plural ports)

  1. (Jersey) harbour, port
    Synonyms: caûchie, hâvre

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Middle Norwegian portr m, from late Old Norse portr m, port n, ultimately from Latin porta f.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port m (definite singular porten, indefinite plural porter, definite plural portene)

  1. a gate
  2. (computing) port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)
  3. (computing) port (female connector of an electronic device)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Norwegian portr m, from late Old Norse port n, ultimately from Latin porta f.

Noun edit

port m (definite singular porten, indefinite plural portar, definite plural portane)

  1. a gate
  2. (computing) port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)
  3. (computing) port (female connector of an electronic device)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin portus (harbour, port, haven, warehouse).

Noun edit

port m

  1. a port, a haven (a harbor or harbor-town)
  2. a town, particularly one with special trading privileges
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Latin porta (gate, entrance, passage, door).

Noun edit

port m

  1. portal (a door or gate; an entrance)
Declension edit
Descendants edit

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin portus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port oblique singularm (oblique plural porz or portz, nominative singular porz or portz, nominative plural port)

  1. port (for watercraft)
    • c. 1150, Turoldus, La Chanson de Roland:
      As porz d'Espaigne en est passet Rollant
      Roland went to the ports of Spain

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin portus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port m (genitive puirt, nominative plural puirt)

  1. place
  2. shore

Inflection edit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative port portL puirtL
Vocative puirt portL portuH
Accusative portN portL portuH
Genitive puirtL port portN
Dative purtL portaib portaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
port phort
or unchanged
port
pronounced with /b(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin portus. First attested in 1471.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /pɔrt/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /pɔrt/

Noun edit

port m ?

  1. port (a place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers)
    • 1901 [1471], Materiały i Prace Komisji Językowej Akademii Umiejętności w Krakowie, volume V, page 135:
      Applicuimus przistalischmy kv portu (inde navigantes... applicuimus Samum Act 20, 15)
      [Applicuimus przystalismy ku portu (inde navigantes... applicuimus Samum Act 20, 15)]

Descendants edit

References edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish port. Sense 4 and sense 5 are semantic loans from English port. Doublet of fiord (fjord).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port m inan (diminutive porcik, related adjective portowy)

  1. port (a place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers)
  2. port (a town or city containing such a place, a port city)
  3. harbor, haven (place of safety)
    Synonyms: azyl, przystań, schronienie
  4. (computing) port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)
  5. (computing, networking) port (number that delimits a connection for specific processes or parts of a network service)
  6. (Middle Polish) goal, aim (intent of one's actions)
    Synonym: cel
  7. (Middle Polish) harbor, haven (one who gives a place of safety)
  8. (Middle Polish) gate (place where one enters)
    Synonym: wrote
  9. (Middle Polish) warehouse
    Synonyms: magazyn, skład
  10. (Middle Polish) a type of tax
  11. (Middle Polish) papal estate; Further details are uncertain.
    • 1560, M. Krowicki, Obrona nauki[3], page 75:
      izali Papieſz [...]/ niewymamił [...]/ na Ceſárzach/ [...]/ rozmáite Páńſtwá/ Kroleſthwá/ Kxięſtwá/ Powiáty/ Miáſtá/ Porty/ Zamki/ Wśi/ Cżyńſze/ Mytá/ Folwárki/ y inſze rozmáite płáty.

Declension edit

Related terms edit

noun

Descendants edit

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), port is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 11 times in scientific texts, 33 times in news, 10 times in essays, 4 times in fiction, and 6 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 64 times, making it the 1026th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “port”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 408

Further reading edit

  • port in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • port in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • port”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • PORT”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 01.10.2019
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814), “port”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861), “port”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1908), “port”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 4, Warsaw, page 719

Romanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French port, Italian porto, Latin portus.

Noun edit

port n (plural porturi)

  1. port (town with port)
Declension edit
Related terms edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

port

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of purta

Scottish Gaelic edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

port m (genitive singular puirt, plural puirt or portan)

  1. tune
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish port (bank, shore (of river or sea); landing-place, haven; bank, mound, entrenchment; place, spot, locality; stead, abode; stronghold, fortress), ultimately from Latin portus (harbour, port; haven, refuge, asylum, retreat).

Noun edit

port m (genitive singular puirt, plural puirt or portan)

  1. port, harbour
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
port phort
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

 
An entrance leading to the stairwell of an apartment building.
 
The castle gate of Malmö Castle.

Etymology 1 edit

From late Old Norse port n, portr m, from Latin porta f. Computing sense a semantic loan from English.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port c

  1. a larger entrance
    1. a door leading into a larger building, e.g. an apartment building
      Jag är vid porten, kan du öppna?
      I'm by the door, can you buzz me in?
    2. a doorway
    3. a gate
    4. a portal
  2. (computing) a port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)
Declension edit
Declension of port 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative port porten portar portarna
Genitive ports portens portars portarnas
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Clipping of portvin.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

port ?

  1. Clipping of portvin (port wine).
    Synonym: porto (obsolete)

References edit

Anagrams edit

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English port.

Noun edit

port (definite accusative portu, plural portlar)

  1. (computer hardware, networking) port

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative port
Definite accusative portu
Singular Plural
Nominative port portlar
Definite accusative portu portları
Dative porta portlara
Locative portta portlarda
Ablative porttan portlardan
Genitive portun portların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular portum portlarım
2nd singular portun portların
3rd singular portu portları
1st plural portumuz portlarımız
2nd plural portunuz portlarınız
3rd plural portları portları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular portumu portlarımı
2nd singular portunu portlarını
3rd singular portunu portlarını
1st plural portumuzu portlarımızı
2nd plural portunuzu portlarınızı
3rd plural portlarını portlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular portuma portlarıma
2nd singular portuna portlarına
3rd singular portuna portlarına
1st plural portumuza portlarımıza
2nd plural portunuza portlarınıza
3rd plural portlarına portlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular portumda portlarımda
2nd singular portunda portlarında
3rd singular portunda portlarında
1st plural portumuzda portlarımızda
2nd plural portunuzda portlarınızda
3rd plural portlarında portlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular portumdan portlarımdan
2nd singular portundan portlarından
3rd singular portundan portlarından
1st plural portumuzdan portlarımızdan
2nd plural portunuzdan portlarınızdan
3rd plural portlarından portlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular portumun portlarımın
2nd singular portunun portlarının
3rd singular portunun portlarının
1st plural portumuzun portlarımızın
2nd plural portunuzun portlarınızın
3rd plural portlarının portlarının