Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indulgent ‎(comparative more indulgent, superlative most indulgent)

  1. Disposed or prone to indulge, humor, gratify, or yield to one's own or another's desires, etc., or to be compliant, lenient, or forbearing; showing or ready to show favor; favorable; indisposed to be severe or harsh, or to exercise necessary restraint:
    an indulgent parent
    to be indulgent to servants
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part I, chapter4:
      An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.
    • 2012 April 29, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Treehouse of Horror III” (season 4, episode 5; originally aired 10/29/1992)”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Mr. Burns is similarly perfectly cast as a heartless capitalist willing to do anything for a quick buck, even if it means endangering the lives of those around him and Marge elegantly rounds out the main cast as a good, pure-hearted and overly indulgent woman who sees the big, good heart (literally and metaphorically) of a monstrous man-brute.

SynonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • indulgent in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indulgent m ‎(feminine singular indulgente, masculine plural indulgents, feminine plural indulgentes)

  1. lenient (tolerant; not strict)

VerbEdit

indulgent

  1. third-person plural present indicative of indulger
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of indulger

External linksEdit


LatinEdit