humor

See also: Humor, humør, and humör

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

humor (plural humors)

  1. US spelling of humour.
    He was in a particularly vile humor that afternoon.
    • 1763, Antoine-Simon Le Page du Pratz, History of Louisisana (PG), p. 40
      For some days a fistula lacrymalis had come into my left eye, which discharged an humour, when pressed, that portended danger.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.

VerbEdit

humor (third-person singular simple present humors, present participle humoring, simple past and past participle humored)

  1. US spelling of humour.
    I know you don't believe my story, but humor me for a minute and imagine it to be true.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
  2. humour

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m

  1. humor (US), humour (UK) (source of amusement)

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /'hymɔr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

NounEdit

humor m (plural humoren or humores)

  1. (uncountable) humour (sense of amusement)
  2. (countable, archaic) humour (bodily fluid) [from the 15th c.]

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhumor/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

NounEdit

humor (plural humorok)

  1. humour, humor

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alternative spelling of umor found in the later Roman Empire, when the letter "h" already became silent.

NounEdit

hūmor m (genitive hūmōris); third declension

  1. liquid, fluid, humour

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative hūmor hūmōrēs
genitive hūmōris hūmōrum
dative hūmōrī hūmōribus
accusative hūmōrem hūmōrēs
ablative hūmōre hūmōribus
vocative hūmor hūmōrēs

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

humor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of humō

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

humor m, f

  1. humor (One of four fluids that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.)

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m

  1. humour
  2. mood (mental state)

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese umor, humor, from Latin hūmor (humour, fluid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
  2. humour; bodily fluid
  3. (historical) humour (one of the four basic bodily fluids in humourism)
  4. humour (quality of being comical)

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

  • (basic bodily fluids): fleuma, bile amarela, bile negra, sangue

Derived termsEdit

  • (mood):
  • bom humor
  • mau humor
  • (bodily fluid):
  • humor vítreo
  • (quality of being comical):
  • humor negro

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English humor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xǔmor/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

NounEdit

hùmor m (Cyrillic spelling ху̀мор)

  1. (uncountable) humor

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood
  2. humor

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally from Latin humor (fluid), having bodily fluids in good balance, as used in humör (mood, temper). The joking sense was derived in England in Shakespeare's time and has been used in Swedish since 1812.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor c

  1. humour (a sense of making jokes)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 09:36