See also: Humor and humör

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor (usually uncountable, plural humors)

  1. US spelling of humour
    He was in a particularly vile humor that afternoon.
    • 1763, Antoine-Simon Le Page du Pratz, History of Louisiana (PG), page 40:
      For some days a fistula lacrymalis had come into my left eye, which discharged an humour, when pressed, that portended danger.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.

VerbEdit

humor (third-person singular simple present humors, present participle humoring, simple past and past participle humored)

  1. US spelling of humour
    I know you don't believe my story, but humor me for a minute and imagine it to be true.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin hūmor, hūmōrem.

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
  2. humour

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin hūmor, hūmōrem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m (plural humors)

  1. humour

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m

  1. humor (US), humour (UK) (source of amusement)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin (h)ūmor (fluid). Doublet of humør (spirits, mood). The modern use of this word for mental processes goes back to Ancient and Medieval theories about the four fluids of the body.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /huːmɔr/, [ˈhuːmɐ]

NounEdit

humor c (singular definite humoren, not used in plural form)

  1. humour (amusement and the sense of amusement)

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English humor (US), from Old French humor (bodily fluid), from Latin hūmor. See also: humore, humeur, humoor, humoristisch, and humuer.

The meaning of humor as in "a sense of amusement" entered Dutch from the US spelling of humour around ~1839.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦymɔr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

NounEdit

humor m (plural humoren or humores)

  1. (uncountable) humour (sense of amusement)
  2. (countable, archaic) humour (bodily fluid) [from the 15th c.]

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin hūmor.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈhumor]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor
  • Rhymes: -or

NounEdit

humor (plural humorok)

  1. humour, humor

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative humor humorok
accusative humort humorokat
dative humornak humoroknak
instrumental humorral humorokkal
causal-final humorért humorokért
translative humorrá humorokká
terminative humorig humorokig
essive-formal humorként humorokként
essive-modal
inessive humorban humorokban
superessive humoron humorokon
adessive humornál humoroknál
illative humorba humorokba
sublative humorra humorokra
allative humorhoz humorokhoz
elative humorból humorokból
delative humorról humorokról
ablative humortól humoroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
humoré humoroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
humoréi humorokéi
Possessive forms of humor
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. humorom humoraim
2nd person sing. humorod humoraid
3rd person sing. humora humorai
1st person plural humorunk humoraink
2nd person plural humorotok humoraitok
3rd person plural humoruk humoraik

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative spelling of ūmor found in the later Roman Empire, when the letter h had already become silent. See also the related hūmidus.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hūmor m (genitive hūmōris); third declension

  1. liquid, fluid, humour
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative hūmor hūmōrēs
Genitive hūmōris hūmōrum
Dative hūmōrī hūmōribus
Accusative hūmōrem hūmōrēs
Ablative hūmōre hūmōribus
Vocative hūmor hūmōrēs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

humor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of humō

ReferencesEdit

  • humor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • humor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

humor

  1. Alternative form of humour

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmor, via German Humor and English humour or humor

NounEdit

humor m (definite singular humoren)

  1. humour (UK) or humor (US)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmor, via German Humor and English humour or humor

NounEdit

humor m (definite singular humoren)

  1. humor (US) or humour (UK)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin hūmor, hūmōrem.

NounEdit

humor m or f

  1. humor (one of four fluids that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body)

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Humor, ultimately from Latin hūmor. See humor for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m inan

  1. humour
  2. mood (mental state)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • humor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese umor, humor, borrowed from Latin hūmor, hūmōrem (humour, fluid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
    Synonyms: disposição, espírito, temperamento
  2. humour; bodily fluid
  3. (historical) humour (one of the four basic bodily fluids in humourism)
    Hyponyms: bile amarela, bile negra, fleuma, sangue
  4. humour (quality of being comical)
    Synonyms: comédia, comicidade, graça

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:humor.

Derived termsEdit

mood
bodily fluid
quality of being comical

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English humor, from Latin hūmor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xǔmor/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

NounEdit

hùmor m (Cyrillic spelling ху̀мор)

  1. (uncountable) humor

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin hūmor, hūmōrem. Cognate with English humor.

NounEdit

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood
  2. humor
    un sentido del humora sense of humor

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally from Latin hūmor (fluid), having bodily fluids in good balance, as used in humör (mood, temper). The joking sense was derived in England in Shakespeare's time and has been used in Swedish since 1812.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

humor c

  1. humour (a sense of making jokes)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of humor 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative humor humorn
Genitive humors humorns

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit