insensible

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French insensible, from Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɛn.sɪ.bl̩/
  • Hyphenation: in‧sen‧si‧ble

AdjectiveEdit

insensible (comparative more insensible, superlative most insensible)

  1. Unable to be perceived by the senses.
  2. Incapable or deprived of physical sensation.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, in The Fate of the Artemis[1]:
      “[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck ; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”
  3. Unable to be understood; unintelligible.
  4. Not sensible or reasonable; meaningless.
    • 1736, Matthew Hale, Historia Placitorum Coronæ
      If it make the indictment be insensible or uncertain, [] it shall be quashed.
  5. Incapable of mental feeling; indifferent.
    • 1697, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      Lost in their loves, insensible of shame.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 138
      In spite of her deep-rooted dislike, she could not be insensible to the compliment of such a man's affection...
  6. Incapable of emotional feeling; callous; apathetic.
    Synonym: insensitive

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French insensible, from Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

insensible (plural insensibles)

  1. insensible
  2. impervious

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin īnsēnsibilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /insenˈsible/, [ĩn.sẽnˈsi.β̞le]

AdjectiveEdit

insensible (plural insensibles)

  1. insensible, insensitive, callous, cold, tactless
    Antonym: sensible

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit