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See also: inséparable

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French inséparable, from Latin īnsēparābilis. Constructed as in- +‎ separable.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /in.ˈsɛ.p(ə).ɹə.bl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inseparable (comparative more inseparable, superlative most inseparable)

  1. Unable to be separated; bound together permanently.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned. But he had then none of the oddities and mannerisms which I hold to be inseparable from genius, and which struck my attention in after days when I came in contact with the Celebrity.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

inseparable (plural inseparables)

  1. Something that cannot be separated from something else.
    • 2002, Brian Carr, ‎Indira Mahalingam, Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy (page 129)
      Jayanta does so in answering an opponent who declares that the very idea of a relation between two inseparables is self-contradictory. How can inseparability and relation be reconciled?

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īnsēparābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inseparable (epicene, plural inseparables)

  1. inseparable

AntonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īnsēparābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inseparable (masculine and feminine plural inseparables)

  1. inseparable

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īnsēparābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inseparable m, f (plural inseparables)

  1. inseparable

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īnsēparābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inseparable (plural inseparables)

  1. inseparable
    Antonyms: separable, incombinable

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

inseparable m (plural inseparables)

  1. lovebird