inutile

See also: innutile

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French inutile, from Middle French, from Latin inutilis. See in- (not), utile.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inutile (comparative more inutile, superlative most inutile)

  1. (obsolete) useless; unprofitable
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], OCLC 1044372886:
      wormwood, and the like, [] dissipate and digest any inutile or excrementitious moisture which lieth in the flesh

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for inutile in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inūtilis (useless).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /i.ny.til/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: inutiles
  • Hyphenation: i‧nu‧tile

AdjectiveEdit

inutile (plural inutiles)

  1. unused
  2. useless, unnecessary, pointless

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inūtilis, from in- + utilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inutile (plural inutili)

  1. useless, unnecessary, needless
  2. ineffective
    Synonym: ineffettivo

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inūtile

  1. nominative neuter singular of inūtilis
  2. accusative neuter singular of inūtilis
  3. vocative neuter singular of inūtilis

Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inutile m or f (plural inutiles)

  1. useless

AntonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit